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Fox News // ABC News

President Donald Trump's favorite network, Fox News, often hesitates to correct the president on his incessant lies. In fact, the network all too often helps perpetuate them.

But when Trump took the podium for a speech on the environment on Monday, the network took the extraordinary step of fact checking the president live on air.

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@Bakari_Sellers/Twitter

Former Secretary of State John Kerry became exasperated with a Republican Congressman who challenged his expertise on climate change during a House Oversight Committee hearing on Tuesday.

Kerry appeared as a witness to push for American leadership on the growing environmental threat. He was subjected to hours of grilling by Republicans who continue to deny the global consensus on climate science.

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NEW YORK, NY - MAY 14: Michael Bloomberg speaks on stage during The Robin Hood Foundation's 2018 benefit at Jacob Javitz Center on May 14, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Robin Hood)

When President Trump withdrew the United States from the Paris Climate Accord, he didn’t just damage the global environment. He damaged the country's reputation. Since World War II, the United States has pledged to be a global leader, using its wealth, power and influence to make decisions that impact people around the planet. World leaders saw the U.S. as an example and its president as “leader of the free world.” That is no longer the case. Instead, some are hoping, the acts of individual Americans could signal to the rest of the world that Trump doesn’t speak for all Americans.

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg said that if the government of the second-largest polluting country won’t participate in this near-global agreement, then it’s up to individuals to step up. He put his money where his mouth is, pledging to donate $4.5 million of his own money to the operations of the UN Climate Change Secretariat in 2018, and will do so again next year if the U.S. continues to stand with climate deniers.

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When the last tree is cut, the last fish is caught, and the last river is polluted; when to breathe the air is sickening, you will realize, too late, that wealth is not in bank accounts and that you can’t eat money.” – Native American Proverb

In the last ten years, the disastrously intensifying consequences of climate change have cost Americans $240 billion per year, which according to the Universal Ecological Fund, corresponds to “about 40 percent of the current economic growth of the United States economy.”

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NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 19: President of France Emmanuel Macron addresses the United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters, September 19, 2017 in New York City. Among the issues facing the assembly this year are North Korea's nuclear developement, violence against the Rohingya Muslim minority in Myanmar and the debate over climate change. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

France is the new leader of the free world, at least where climate change is concerned. After President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Accord in June, French President Emmanuel Macron announced Wednesday that France will cover the amount the U.S. contributed to the United Nations' climate science research.

“They will not miss a single euro,” Macron said, according to Reuters.

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The news in 2015 was unforgettable, historic, often chilling to watch. From the specter of global terrorism to controversial social issues, from the confused state of politics to corporate corruption, important issues played out on the public stage of opinion, augmented by a hyper-connected global community.

The Second Nexus editors culled through the news that made headlines and dominated trending topics over this past year and selected our ten most important stories, in no particular order. We’re confident only that many will disagree with our list. So have a look, and have at.

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