oh-myyy-ribbon
A new GoPro Karma foldable drone is seen flying during a press event in Olympic Valley, California on September 19, 2016. / AFP / JOSH EDELSON (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Drone deliveries are shaping up to be the future of shipping, so naturally the race is on to see which service can most quickly utilize this relatively new technology to create more seamless and efficient delivery experiences.

It looks like we might have a winner.

Keep reading... Show less
stevecoleimages via Getty Images

"Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables" has been common advice for centuries, but soon it may be doctor's orders.

Researchers are calling for access to prescriptions for fruits and vegetables to prevent common ailments, rather than treating these ailments with medications after they've already shown symptoms. A new simulation by health professionals is bolstering this evidence.

Keep reading... Show less
This illustration picture shows a saliva collection kit for DNA testing displayed in Washington DC on December 19, 2018. - Between 2015 and 2018, sales of DNA test kits boomed in the United States and allowed websites to build a critical mass of DNA profiles. The four DNA websites that offer match services -- Ancestry, 23andMe, Family Tree DNA, My Heritage -- today have so many users that it is rare for someone not to find at least one distant relative. (Photo by Eric BARADAT / AFP) (Photo credit should read ERIC BARADAT/AFP/Getty Images)

Genetic testing company 23andMe has just gotten FDA approval to sell a test for hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome directly to their consumers.

The test examines three genetic variants of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry that have indicated a correlation to the cancer syndrome. It's the second time that 23andMe has been approved for a cancer test based on genetic mutations, with the first being a test for the BRCA gene which can act as a litmus test for the likelihood of developing breast cancer.

Keep reading... Show less
Douglas Sacha/Getty Images

The former head of Insys Therapeutics will plead guilty for his part in bribing doctors to prescribe a powerful opioid in an effort to increase the drug's sales.

Federal prosecutors in Boston revealed that Michael Babich will plead guilty to conspiracy and mail fraud.

Keep reading... Show less
The venom from the deathstalker scorpion is now thought to be a treatment for brain cancer. Photographed at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County on Wednesday, August 23, 2006. (Photo by Stephen Osman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

There are few times when anyone is actually glad to come upon a scorpion. With loathsome pincers and painful venom, the creatures are widely regarded as terrifying and sometimes even deadly.

But in the case of the Deathstalker scorpion, its venom is proving to be quite useful—so useful that it's become the most expensive liquid on the planet.

Keep reading... Show less

Immunotherapy represents a whole new approach for combating several types of human cancers. The tactic involves scientists genetically reprogramming the cells of a person’s immune system to target and attack malignancies. Immunotherapy is now considered the “fifth pillar” of cancer treatments, rapidly evolving into a more promising tool for battling cancer than standard radiation and chemotherapeutic treatments.

Although there are many different immunotherapies in development and practice, chimeric antigen receptor T-cells (CAR-T) therapy has shown the most promise to date. Indeed, CAR-T therapy is the first anti-cancer gene therapy to be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use against advanced adult lymphomas and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Unfortunately, just recently, a patient given CAR-T therapy for aggressive leukemia died as result of the treatment.

Keep reading... Show less
Shutterstock

The headlines began in 2014: Formerly healthy children contracted what seemed to be a minor upper respiratory infection and were suddenly paralyzed — sometimes one limb, sometimes multiple limbs, sometimes permanently.

Parents and experts wondered if it could be a brand-new virus, West Nile disease, or even a mutated version of polio, which hadn’t been seen in the U.S. since the late 1970s.

Keep reading... Show less