nc.aaml.org; North Carolina State Archives

As the 2020 election approaches, state laws aimed at voter suppression, gerrymandering and purging voters from the official rolls are gaining attention.

For those working to protect voter rights, a victory occurred in North Carolina Tuesday.

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Erich Schlegel/Getty Images // John Lamparski/WireImage via Getty Images

Last week, 16-year-old environmental activist Greta Thunberg gave a copy of The United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2019 report to U.S. lawmakers as part of her congressional testimony on the climate crisis.

However, Pastor Robert Jeffress—an Evangelical Christian minister and vehement supporter of President Donald Trump—proclaimed that perhaps Thunberg should consult quite a different document.

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Win McNamee/Getty Images;

Since her arrival on the world stage, 16 year-old Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg has faced derision. Mocking criticism has been aimed at Thunberg's appearance, mannerisms, facial expressions, speech patterns, intelligence, mental health and her self-disclosed Asperger's Syndrome diagnosis with the majority coming from conservative men.

On Monday, in a late-night tweet, President Donald Trump decided to similarly weigh in on Thunberg. In an example of the cyber bullying First Lady Melania Trump's Be Best campaign is supposed to address, the 73 year-old President of the United States shared video of an impassioned speech Thunberg delivered at the U.N. calling out world leaders' inaction on the climate with the caption:

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Fox & Friends/Fox News

Fox & Friends often draws criticism for their hosts' comments. Openly displayed devotion to President Donald Trump, his administration staff, and family members means whatever Trump loves, Ainsley Earhardt, Steve Doocy and Brian Kilmeade—the weekday couch denizens—promote.

And whatever Trump dislikes, the Fox hosts mock or otherwise attempt to discredit.

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C-SPAN

Teen climate activist Greta Thunberg—visiting the United States from her native Sweden to attend the United Nations Climate Action Summit beginning Monday in New York—spoke during a hearing of the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis in Washington DC.

In an attempt to justify inaction on climate change through pointing fingers at countries that pollute more, Louisiana Republican Representative Garret Graves tried to make the point that inaction by one justifies inaction by all who pollute as long as they pollute "less."

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Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

After revealing more details from a credible allegation of sexual misconduct by controversial Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, The New York Times found themselves needing to apologize for their social media promotion of the breaking story. The Times was promoting The Education of Brett Kavanaugh: An Investigation by New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly.

On Sunday, the editorial division of the newspaper—The New York Times Opinion—under their account @nytopinion posted a tweet characterizing sexual misconduct as "harmless fun." The article the tweet promoted was an excerpt from the book focused on Deborah Ramirez's experiences with Kavanaugh at Yale.

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John Moore/Getty Images // @icegov/Twitter

September 11 since 2001 has become a day of reflection for many individuals and organizations. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was no exception.

Like many federal agencies, they took the opportunity to commemorate 9/11. But unlike others—many who actually participated in threat mitigation and recovery efforts after the attack—ICE decided to herald their own accomplishments rather than make a statement about those who died or those who stepped up.

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