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Even in the face of a global pandemic, President Donald Trump hasn't dispensed with his typical pettiness.

The President made that perfectly clear on Sunday afternoon, as deaths caused by the national health crisis continued to increase.

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As the apex of the current pandemic looms in the United States, more and more Americans have begun working from home in an effort to slow the virus.

Television hosts aren't an exception to this—including far-Right Fox News host Judge Jeanine Pirro, whose performance on air this past Saturday night seemed a bit...off.

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President Donald Trump, his administration, and his allies continue to accuse the media of promoting hysteria even as the pandemic that has taken over the United States claims over 93,000 cases and 1,400 deaths.

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As the national health crisis in the United States continues to worsen, New York has quickly become the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States.

New York City alone has over 20,000 confirmed cases of the virus, and the state's death toll skyrocketed by 110% in just 36 hours this week. The urgency is only exacerbated by a shortage of crucial ventilators to combat the respiratory virus.

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If you thought President Donald Trump's obsession with "windmills" would blow over in the face of a national crisis, think again.

The President has previously said that wind turbines cause cancer and that wind-powered energy only works if the wind is blowing. You can add those claims to the 16,200+ false statements made by Trump since his inauguration.

The President repeated his claim that windmills endanger birds in a Fox News town hall on Tuesday afternoon.

As Congress prepares a stimulus package to offset the damage to American workers posed by the current pandemic, Republicans and Democrats are split over whether to include initiatives that would help offset the damage done to the clean energy sector.

House Democrats, led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California. say the move is necessary, with $43 billion in investments and payments threatening to evaporate.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Trump doesn't support the initiative to boost clean energy.

Watch below.

Trump said:

"They had things in there that are terrible. Windmills all over the place and all sorts of credits for windmills that kill the birds and ruin the real estate, right?"

Trump said this as cases of the virus continued to grow to nearly 50,000 in the United States.

People noted that Trump, a real estate mogul, also claimed wind turbines ruined the real estate, leading them to believe his concern for the birds was, well, "for the birds."




After some pointed out that the claim was false...

People began repeating concerns that the President is unfit to lead the nation out of this crisis.



Trump has had a grudge against wind turbines ever since he lost a legal battle to keep a field of them from construction near one of his golf courses in Scotland.

Even in dire times, the President doesn't appear ready to give up that grudge.



MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

The growing health crisis faced by the United States continues to worsen as cases of the highly contagious virus grow by the day.

Countless churches, schools, restaurants, and other businesses across the country have shut their doors to slow its spread.

As a result, millions of people have found themselves unemployed and the markets have plummeted. With the economy a crucial talking point in favor of his reelection, President Donald Trump and his administration have indicated an eagerness to scale back social distancing measures designed to protect the public and save millions of lives.

In lieu of his daily briefings regarding the virus, Trump held a virtual town hall on Fox News Tuesday afternoon, where he took questions from viewers.

In one of his answers, the President said he'd like to have the United States back up and running by Easter—a little over two weeks away—on April 12.

Watch below.


Trump said:

"I'd love to have it open by Easter. I would love to have it open by Easter...It's such an important day for other reasons, but I'll make it an important day for this too. I would love to have the country opened up and just raring to go by Easter."

After a stunned reaction from Fox News host Harris Faulkner, her colleague Bill Hemmer said:

"That would be a great American resurrection."

For those unfamiliar, Easter is the Christian celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ three days after his crucifixion.

Despite Hemmer singing the praises of Trump's goal, medical experts have stressed that the 15 day period of isolation touted by the Trump administration isn't enough to slow the spread of the virus, and that the consequences of a premature rollback could be detrimental to both society and the economy.

People didn't agree that the move would lead to a resurrection.




It's important to note that the Trump administration has taken little federal action to promote social distancing. The measures have largely been implemented by governors and mayors across the country. It's unclear whether or not most of them would acquiesce to Trump's calls to scale back cautionary measures or if they'd listen to medical experts.

People continued to point out that medical experts are warning against the decision.




The curve isn't expected to reach its peak for another two or so weeks—likely around Easter. The worst is yet to come.

Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Fox News host Steve Hilton claimed that the "ruling class and their TV mouthpieces" were whipping up fear about the current health crisis that's closed businesses across the United States in efforts to slow the spread of the pandemic. The screed was a continuation of the network's repeated dismissals of the threat posed by the pandemic.

Hilton said that an ensuing recession due to these closures could be more deadly than the virus itself.

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