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President Donald Trump is receiving backlash for a sudden announcement of a cancelled meeting with leaders of the Taliban, a violent and fundamentalist political movement, at Camp David during the 18th anniversary of the September 11 attacks.

The peace talks were aimed at ending the years long conflict in Afghanistan, but were called off after the Taliban—which sheltered Osama Bin Laden for years and championed political violence against the United States—claimed credit for an attack in Kabul that left 12 people, including an American soldier, dead.

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images // Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

The Trump administration's tacit acceptance of violent rhetoric has reached a new low: they're declining to join New Zealand and France in a commitment to fight online terrorism.

The Christchurch Call for Action, named after the March 15 mass shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand, encourages tech companies to work together to step up their efforts to keep terrorism off social media. The Christchurch massacre was livestreamed on Facebook, and viewed and reposted by millions before Facebook was able to block it.

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WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 19: Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) questions U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director L. Francis Cissna during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing June 19, 2018 in Washington, DC. The committee heard testimony on recent immigration issues relating to border security and the EB-5 Investor Visa Program. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) confused Twitter users yesterday when he tweeted about a border wall to defend against "radical Islam."

While President Donald Trump—with whom Graham often allies himself—works to rally support for a border wall and also leans heavily on tropes to stoke fears of Islamist terror, the two are unrelated.

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After days of unrest in which 13 improvised explosive devices were sent to high-profile Democrats and media organizations across the country, investigators have apprehended the culprit, Cesar Sayoc. Sayoc's would-be victims have all been targets of repeated harsh words and false claims by President Donald Trump, leading many to believe that Sayoc's actions were motivated by the president's rhetoric.

While information is still emerging, it appears that the "false flag" claim floated by many Trump loyalists isn't going to fly. The windows of Sayoc's van were covered in pro-Trump and anti-Democrat propaganda, including one featuring former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton with a target on her face.

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The Austin serial bomber has been identified as Mark Anthony Conditt, 23. He was committed suicide in Round Rock, Texas, in the early hours of March 21 after being confronted by Austin Police Department SWAT officers. Conditt died after detonating a car bomb inside of his vehicle.

The attacks began on March 2 with the death of 39-year-old Anthony Stephan House. On March 12, Draylen Mason, 17, was also killed by one of Conditt's bombs. Between March 2 and March 21, three other bombs exploded causing multiple serious injuries while one other was discovered and deactivated.

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On Dec. 31, 2017, millions of people around the world will gather in major cities and national capitals with the intention of enjoying a boisterous celebration of the coming new year. Some question, however, if a more nefarious force will threaten the joyous welcoming of 2018 with random and deadly acts of terror.

Since the Islamic State’s inception and the continued spread of its ideals, fear over a terrorist attack during New Year’s Eve celebrations has increased. For New Year’s Eve 2017, those worries have not subsided and with recent threats made on the grand party, they may be well founded.

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Akayed Ullah has been named as the suspect in the bombing this morning at the Port Authority subway, according to CBS New York.

The NYPD is continuing its investigation.

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