january 6

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The House Select Committee on the January 6 insurrection continues to investigate the events of that day, when a mob of pro-Trump extremists—motivated by the former President's election lies—stormed the United States Capitol, shattering windows, ransacking offices, beating police officers, and calling for the deaths of any lawmaker deemed disloyal to Trump.

So far, the committee—still in its early stages—has held one public hearing, where Capitol and D.C. Metro Police officers testified about the peril they faced in defending the Capitol from the Trump mob.

While the officers were forthcoming in testifying to lawmakers about their experiences, the next wave of the investigation is proving more difficult.

The Committee recently subpoenaed multiple Trump officials for any communications leading up to or regarding the events of January 6, giving them until October 7 to provide documents and October 15 for a deposition.

Among those subpoenaed was Trump's former White House deputy Chief of Staff, Dan Scavino, citing his proximity to the former President and the insight he could provide into Trump's mindset in the days leading up to the insurrection. But with the deadline drawing closer, Scavino is nowhere to be found.

Sources told CNN that officials have been unable to locate Scavino in order to physically serve him the subpoena, leading them to believe he's intentionally dodging them. Scavino has been actively tweeting in recent days, often targeting the committee. One source joked to CNN that they should consider tweeting the subpoena to him to be sure he's received it.

Whatever the case may be, social media users are calling for the subpoena to be enforced, even if drastic measures are required.




Throughout his presidency, Trump routinely ordered his officials and allies to defy Congressional subpoenas in an effort to block any and all attempts at accountability or oversight. It doesn't come as a surprise that the allies who embraced his election lies are ready to do the same.

Nevertheless, people had one name for Scavino.



It's unclear what steps the committee will take to enforce the subpoena.