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Fox & Friends/Fox News

Fox & Friends often draws criticism for their hosts' comments. Openly displayed devotion to President Donald Trump, his administration staff, and family members means whatever Trump loves, Ainsley Earhardt, Steve Doocy and Brian Kilmeade—the weekday couch denizens—promote.

And whatever Trump dislikes, the Fox hosts mock or otherwise attempt to discredit.

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@EamonJavers/Twitter // @MrNCE/Twitter

Eamon Javers, a Washington correspondent for CNBC covering the Trump White House, shared an image on Twitter Monday morning. The photo showed flooding in the White House basement.

The image showed cubicles and desk chairs on a carpet with a spreading pool of water.

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Lebanese divers take part in cleaning the seabed off the coastal city of Batroun, north of Beirut, on October 14, 2017. The Lebanese divers plunge below the surface, scuba tanks on their backs and nets in hand. But what they're looking for under the ocean surface is not treasure, it's trash. The group is conducting a clean-up below the waves, one of many initiatives emerging from Lebanon's civil society and private sector in response to the government's failure to address a long-running garbage crisis. / AFP PHOTO / IBRAHIM CHALHOUB (Photo credit should read IBRAHIM CHALHOUB/AFP/Getty Images)

Anyone who has carried a couple of gallons of water any distance knows just how heavy the planet’s most abundant liquid actually is. So perhaps it won’t be surprising to learn that the melting of the Arctic and Antarctica has had a profound and dramatic effect on the ocean floor.

It’s almost inconceivable, but with all the added weight, the ocean floor is sinking. And no, that isn’t good news for the planet. Once again, climate deniers have pulled and twisted the science to suit their own agenda, and they couldn’t be more wrong.

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HAYALES DE COAMO, PUERTO RICO - SEPTEMBER 24: Karlian Mercado, 7, Carmen Maldonado, Carlos Flores and Jose Flores (L-R) stand on what remains of their home after it was blown away by Hurricane Maria as it passed through the area on September 24, 2017 in Hayales de Coamo, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

As the skies clear above the devastation left by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, and the long road to recovery begins, many are concerned about other consequences from the storms beyond property and infrastructure damage. Harvey was expected to curtail U.S. oil production for several weeks, affecting every aspect of the oil industry down to the pump at gas stations throughout the country. Public health and environmental contamination are other major concerns, as well as such destructive storms becoming the norm due to climate change.

Harvey’s excessive rainfall along the Gulf of Mexico coastline exposed a vulnerability of the energy industry regarding the refineries and chemical production in the area, according to Michael E. Webber, deputy director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas in Austin: “Over the long term, the energy sector will have to consider the costs of additional hardening of the infrastructure on the Gulf Coast versus moving to a different location like the Eastern Seaboard.”

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Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic.

There may be no natural disaster more humbling than hurricanes, with their gale force winds and flood-surges that destroy people’s homes, livelihoods and lives. Now two of them, back-to-back, have battered the United States and parts of the Caribbean and Cuba in the space of three weeks, including Harvey, a Category 4 hurricane, which left much of Houston underwater, and Irma, which started out as a Category 5, the biggest hurricane to hit the United States since Andrew in 1992.

“The U.S. has never been hit, since we started collecting records in 1851, by two Category 4 or stronger hurricanes in the same season,” said Jeff Masters, a meteorologist and co-founder of Weather Underground.

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As Houston and the surrounding coastal Texas area experiences unprecedented rainfall and flooding from Hurricane Harvey, heroes from all walks of life are weathering the storm to rescue thousands of their stranded neighbors. From a major airline company and breweries, to the unlikeliest of civilians, all have stepped up to lend aid during the crisis.

Sunday evening, Southwest Airlines evacuated 486 people from Houston, including employees and customers. The Dallas based airline requested and received special permission to operate five flights out of the international William P. Hobby Airport, located in southeast Houston.

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[DIGEST: Washington Post, Boston Globe, New York Times]

Two related studies published late last month show that global sea levels are rising at an alarming rate. Along with the rise in tides, people can also expect increased flooding, especially along the East Coast.

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