oh-myyy-ribbon
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 08: Kellyanne Conway, counselor to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks to the press outside the West Wing of the White House January 8, 2019 in Washington, DC. Conway took questions on Trump’s scheduled address to the nation later this evening. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The Hatch Act of 1939 prohibits executive branch employees—with exception to the President and Vice President—from engaging in political activity. This includes endorsing candidates, appearing at campaign rallies, generating funds for candidates, and other forms that can be seen to give a partisan advantage.

White House aide Kellyanne Conway has come under fire numerous times for perceived Hatch Act violations. Now, the Office of the Special Counsel (unrelated to Special Counsel Robert Mueller) is referring Conway for removal for said violations.

Keep reading... Show less
(Photos by Win McNamee and Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Last year, the United States Justice Department, headed by Attorney General Jeff Sessions decided to conduct a more thorough investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and any ties to the campaign of President Donald Trump. This move came after investigations led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and in the House and Senate and the high profile firing of the FBI director, James Comey, by the president.

Trump administration member AG Sessions recused himself from the investigation, turning it over to another Trump appointee, Rod Rosenstein. Rosenstein decided to appoint former FBI director Robert Mueller as Special Counsel exactly one year ago today. All three men are lifelong Republicans.

Keep reading... Show less
May 10, 2018: Mike Pence Today Show interview. (NBC News)
Keep reading... Show less
U.S. President Donald Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, May 3, 2018. (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

This morning, President Donald Trump Tweeted, "Is this Phony Witch Hunt going to go on even longer so it wrongfully impacts the Mid-Term Elections, which is what the Democrats always intended? Republicans better get tough and smart before it is too late!"

Trump consistently refers to Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, a probe led by Trump's own United States Attorney General office's duly appointed Republican Special Counsel, as a "witch hunt." He also takes issue with the length of time of the investigation.

Keep reading... Show less
Retiring White House Counsel Ty Cobb (CNN video)

Ty Cobb joined the White House legal team under President Donald Trump on July 31, 2017. Now he’s announced his retirement.

Cobb's primary responsibility was to deal with the Office of Special Counsel regarding the Russia investigation. His replacement, Emmet Flood, represented President Bill Clinton during his impeachment.

Keep reading... Show less
(Photos by Alex Wong and Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Monday, a list of potential questions for President Donald Trump from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's office, compiled and written by Trump's personal lawyers, was leaked to the press. Now those 49 questions, written out by Trump attorney Jay Sekulow, are being touted as proof of overreach by Mueller's Russia investigation.

Trump's legal team denied any connection to the leak of the questions. However their strategy to discredit the Russia probe for overreach is dependent on the questions being made public.

Keep reading... Show less
President Donald Trump (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

In the latest move in the investigation into possible interference by Russian interests in the 2016 presidential election and potential ties to the campaign and administration of President Donald Trump, Special Counsel Robert Mueller provided tentative questions for the president to his lawyers.

The Russia probe wishes to interview Trump concerning what he knew, and when, about ties between his team and Russian interests. The inquiry also looks into Trump's actions after the investigation began and any attempts to intervene or influence it.

Keep reading... Show less