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MSNBC

Justice Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination to replace the late Justice Anthony Kennedy was thrown into uncertainty last year when Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford came forward with sexual assault allegations against him.

Democrats were ultimately unsuccessful in blocking Kavanaugh's confirmation and he now sits on the Supreme Court.

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CNN via @knicole_a/Twitter

Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) fired back on Thursday at President Donald Trump after Trump said she was "nasty" in her grilling of Attorney General William Barr.

"She was probably very nasty,” Trump said of Harris in an interview on Fox Business. Trump also accused Harris and other Senators seeking to beat Trump in 2020 of "ranting and raving like lunatics" in order to score "political points" by tearing down Barr.

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C-SPAN

Attorney General William Barr testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee following revelations that Special Counsel Robert Mueller expressed concern that Barr's four page summary of Mueller's 448 page report misrepresented the Special Counsel's findings on allegations of obstruction by President Donald Trump.

One of the highlights of the lengthy hearing was Senator Mazie Hirono (D-HI) grilling Barr for prioritizing the President over the justice system as a whole.

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@girlsreallyrule/Twitter

During his testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Attorney General William Barr insisted that President Donald Trump ordering his underlings to lie to Special Counsel Robert Mueller did not meet the definition of obstruction of justice.

Mueller outlined in his report that Trump had instructed then-White House Counsel Don McGahn to deny that he had ordered McGahn to fire Mueller:

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U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) returns to the U.S. Capitol from a meeting at the White House January 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump walked out of a meeting with congressional leaders at the White House negotiating border security funding and government shutdown, calling it "a total waste of time." (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In an October 2018 essay for the New York Review of Bookshistorian Christopher Browning, Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an expert on the rise of the Nazis and the Holocaust, answered the question many people around the world have found themselves asking since 2016.

Are there similarities between the political landscape of President Donald Trump's United States and Adolph Hitler's Germany?

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Republican Senators Ted Cruz, John Cornyn, and Lindsey Graham chat during a break in the testimony of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford during Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo By Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images)

The idea of the "paid protester" is one Donald Trump floated while he campaigned for President. Trump maintained anyone opposing him at his rallies were simply paid to be there.

It is a narrative adapted from conspiracy theorists who dismiss events that do not fit into their world view—like school shootings—as the work of paid actors. Rather than admit considerable numbers of people vocally opposing him, the President accuses them of being paid to protest.

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Mark Wilson/Saul Loeb/Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's high school yearbook has been a major source of concern since multiple allegations of sexual assault have been lodged against the judge. Kavanaugh's yearbook entry lists achievements like "Devil's triangle," "Renate Alumnius," "boofing," "100 keg club," and others.

Enter Judge Merrick Garland, former President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nominee whom Republicans refused to meet with and who, unlike Kavanaugh, never got a hearing in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Senate Republicans instead held a seat open on the nation's highest court for over a year. Many Americans haven't forgotten the seat stolen from Garland (a seat that ultimately was filled by Justice Neil Gorsuch last year.)

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