Twitter Just Suspended Cesar Sayoc's Twitter Account, and It's About Time, It Was Just as Bonkers as You'd Expect

After days of unrest in which 13 improvised explosive devices were sent to high-profile Democrats and media organizations across the country, investigators have apprehended the culprit, Cesar Sayoc. Sayoc's would-be victims have all been targets of repeated harsh words and false claims by President Donald Trump, leading many to believe that Sayoc's actions were motivated by the president's rhetoric.

While information is still emerging, it appears that the "false flag" claim floated by many Trump loyalists isn't going to fly. The windows of Sayoc's van were covered in pro-Trump and anti-Democrat propaganda, including one featuring former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton with a target on her face.


So perhaps it should come as little surprise that his Twitter account too was full of anti-Democratic and pro-Trump rhetoric. In fact, he'd been reported to Twitter in the past:

Well, Twitter did finally suspend his account but the Internet doesn't forget.

One video showed him at a Trump rally in June.

Many of the tweets - though often incoherent - were about those he would later target with the explosive devices, like Maxine Waters.

And billionaire philanthropist and liberal donor George Soros.

And another on DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, whose office was used as the return address on the devices.

Sayoc's tweets displayed a particular ire for former President Barack Obama, who was also targeted by the explosive devices.

Several tweets attacked the "left-wing media" for supposedly obscuring erotic photographs of President Barack Obama's mother. Interestingly enough, none of the tweets address the many nude and erotic photographs taken of Melania Trump during her modeling career.

While information regarding the crimes is still emerging, the Twitter paints a portrait of a man obsessed with avenging Donald Trump and Republicans while spreading ire for Democrats. Some indicated violent tendencies.

In a tweet from last week, Sayoc tweeted "death" tarot cards with a barely coherent message directed at entertainment news network TMZ, in which he tells the network to "shut your hole before you end up like media slime Saudi Arabia," presumably about Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who was murdered earlier this month.

Another tweet appeared to threaten CNN, to whom Sayoc sent multiple bombs.

Some have claimed that, because none of the bombs detonated, that they were no more than the equivalent of movie props.

But the FBI has emphasized that these were not anywhere near a hoax.

Officials say Sayoc is likely to be charged in the state of New York at the least. It is unclear how his fanaticism will be spun or if this will have any effect on the rhetoric emerging from Trump's White House.

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