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Michigan Trump Electors Roasted After Video of Them Getting Shut Out of Capitol Goes Viral

@BGOnTheScene // Twitter

The swing state of Michigan—and its 16 electoral votes—has been a major target of President Donald Trump's efforts to subvert the results of the 2020 presidential election, which saw President-elect Joe Biden defeat him with 306 electoral votes.

With Trump losing nearly 60 frivolous lawsuits and firing off countless lie-ridden tweets about widespread voter fraud coordinated by Democrats tipping the election to Biden, electors across the country met as scheduled on December 14 to cast their state's electoral votes for President—including Michigan.

Michigan's electors cast the state's 16 electoral votes for Biden, as expected, but Republicans still denying the reality of Biden's victory still attempted to oppose the constitutionally enshrined process.

Michigan state representative Gary Eisen warned in a Monday morning radio interview that GOP electors would be planning a "Hail Mary" attempt to overthrow the will of Michigan voters. Eisen was stripped of his committee assignments when he wouldn't rule out the possibility of violence during the demonstration.

But what actually transpired was rather anticlimactic.

Michigan's Republican electors attempted to infiltrate the Capitol and submit so-called electoral votes for Trump—but they didn't get far.

Watch below.


Because of threats of violence in reaction to the election results, Michigan legislative buildings are closed to the public for the third time this year.

As the so-called electors attempted to infiltrate the building, state police denied their requests. Attorney Ian Northon falsely claimed that Republican electors were being barred from doing their Constitutional duty, despite Michigan certifying the results of Biden's victory last month and appointing Democratic electors in reflection of that.

The GOP electors do not have a "constitutional duty" to submit votes for Trump because Trump lost.

People mocked the delusional attempt at overturning Michigan's election's results.






But the disinformation traveled fast, and soon, Trump's supporters were under the collective delusion that the non-electors were being denied some sort of constitutional right that allows them to submit electoral votes for the loser of the election.



As Trump reaps rewards from "Stop the Steal" donations, Republicans seem convinced that having would-be Republican electors cast votes for the loser somehow amounts to an official act.

This seems to be the latest quixotic line of attack to secure another four years of Trump.