Trump's Former Doctor Says He Had to Hide Cauliflower in Trump's Mashed Potatoes to Improve His Diet

Stephen Lovekin/WireImage for Hill & Knowlton

From well done steaks to taco bowls, some of the most bizarre moments in the political career of President Donald Trump have centered around food.

You can add another moment to that list.


Former White House physician Ronny Jackson confessed to the New York Times that he regretted not fully implementing an improved diet and fitness regimen for the President.

Jackson said:

"The exercise stuff never took off as much as I wanted it to. But we were working on his diet. We were making the ice cream less accessible, we were putting cauliflower into the mashed potatoes."

Some of Trump's favorite foods include pizza, KFC, meatloaf, cherry-vanilla ice cream, chocolate cake, and McDonald's. He's been known to serve a smorgasbord of fast food at White House receptions for college athletes.

Some thought Jackson's methods demonstrated the President's infantilism.







The 73-year-old Trump has sparked concerns in the past regarding his health.

Late last year, he was unexpectedly taken to Walter Reed Medical Center and stayed out of the public eye immediately after, leading some to believe the President had suffered an emergency.

The White House insisted that this was just part one of the President's annual physical, despite the White House medical facility having all the necessary equipment to conduct a physical without a visit to Walter Reed.

Curiouser and curiouser.

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images // Samuel Corum/Getty Images

A recent in-depth report from the Washington Post detailed the 70 day period between President Donald Trump's first knowledge of the virus and his eventual acknowledgment that the pandemic—which has killed over 10,000 people in the United States—poses a serious threat.

Trump's constant dismissal of the virus wasn't for lack of experts and longtime lawmakers warning him of the possibilities, as Washington Post opinion writer Greg Sargent points out.

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Author and military historian Max Boot is a self-identified conservative, but he's by no means a supporter of President Donald Trump. Boot endorsed former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Presidential election and he's frequently referred to Trump as the worst President in modern times.

But in a blistering new op-ed for the Washington Post, Boot removes the "in modern times" qualifier, referring to Trump as simply the worst President in U.S. history, citing his delayed and inadequate response to the virus that's brought the United States to a standstill.

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

In the face of a pandemic that's led to thousands of deaths in the United States, President Donald Trump's daily press briefings regarding the virus have often resulted in fewer answers and greater uncertainty, with the President unable or unwilling to provide accurate information to the American people.

As a result, media outlets have found themselves scrambling to fact check the President and some of his associates in real time. One local NPR station stopped broadcasting the briefings all together, instead compiling the statements from medical experts on the White House virus task force, such as Nation Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases director Dr. Anthony Fauci.

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C-SPAN

As the pandemic that's caused a national health crisis continues to worsen, President Donald Trump has been unyielding as ever in his eagerness to spread misinformation. It's made for some tense moments between the President and reporters.

One of the President's most damaging lines of misinformation has been his endorsement of hydroxychloroquine, a drug typically used for malaria, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Trump has touted the drug—which hasn't undergone trials to treat the virus—as a possible cure.

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ABC News

As more information becomes available regarding the virus that's caused a public health crisis in the United States, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have urged Americans in hard-hit areas to begin wearing cloth masks to cover their faces.

Unlike medical professionals, who need N95 masks (of which there is a shortage) when treating virus patients, average Americans can wear makeshift cloth masks that block the saliva droplets through which the virus is spread.

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Tom Brenner/Getty Images // MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Given President Donald Trump's propensity for lying and his administration's constant misinformation regarding the current global pandemic, Americans across the country have become selective about which sources they deem as credible in seeking potentially lifesaving information in the face of a national health crisis.

Iowa's Republican governor, Kim Reynolds, is in stark disagreement with most Americans on whom to trust regarding measures designed to curb the virus.

Iowa is one of a few states that still has yet to issue a stay-at-home order to slow the virus's spread. Reynolds has resisted taking the step despite a unanimous recommendation from the Iowa Board of Medicine to do so.

National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) director Dr. Anthony Fauci recently said that all states should institute these orders.

Reynolds's response was...telling.

After calling stay-at-home orders a "divisive issue," the governor said:

"I would say that maybe [Fauci] doesn't have all the information"

Fauci has quickly become one of the most notable figures in the pandemic's response, and one of the few officials in President Donald Trump's virus task force that Americans widely trust to deliver accurate information. He's been an integral part of curbing health crises from the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States to Avian Flu to H1N1 and more.

If Fauci doesn't have all the information, then the country is—for lack of a better word—completely screwed.

People were appalled at the governor's defense.





It's safe to say that Fauci has more information and experience in these situations than any governor in the nation—including Reynolds.



The death toll in the United States from the virus recently surpassed 6000.

Information saves lives. Ignorance endangers them.