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President Donald Trump returned to his Manhattan roots on Tuesday afternoon, giving a rambling speech to the Economic Club of New York.

As is typical for the President, Trump touted the booming employment rate continuing from the long-established trend set by former President Barack Obama.

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Wal-Mart Stores Inc's shelf-scanning robot roams the isles of a Wal-Mart store in this handout photo released October 26, 2017. (WalMart/Handout via REUTERS)

Walmart shoppers can expect to see robots roaming the aisles in 2018. After a successful testing pilot, the retailer plans to introduce robots to 50 stores by the end of January 2018, with more to come. These robots, which do not resemble humans, consist of a large, two-foot high canister base with a tall extension arm outfitted with a scanner and a camera. They cruise aisles, scanning shelves for out-of-stock items, things put in the wrong place by customers, incorrect prices, and wrong or missing labels. They move continuously through the store, alerting human employees of errors.

Walmart says the robots are 50 percent more productive and three times faster than a human. Plus, claims Walmart Chief Technology Officer Jeremy King, human employees are bad at this task. "If you are running up and down the aisle, and you want to decide if we are out of Cheerios or not, a human doesn't do that job very well and they don't like it."

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There are an estimated 3.5 million Americans on the autism spectrum, a number that continues to grow. An estimated 50,000 people on the spectrum enter adulthood – and the potential workforce – each year.

Though many on the spectrum are considered high functioning, recent research finds that 40 percent of young autistic adults are unable to find employment. Across all ages, the number is even more staggering – with some research showing that upwards of 80 percent of those who fall on the spectrum are unemployed, despite the majority wanting employment.

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On April 12, the United States recognized Equal Pay Day. This was more an aspiration than reality, as even in 2015, female full-time workers made 79 cents for every dollar earned by men. That discrepancy increases when the woman has children. According to 2013 data, mothers employed full time are paid 71 cents for every dollar paid to fathers. This gap is even worse for single mothers with full-time jobs, who are paid 58 cents for every dollar paid to fathers. (In contrast, a recent study found fathers with one child earned 21 percent more than childless men.)

But what about women who don’t have kids? Are they subject to the same discrimination?

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