Don Jr. Tried to Shame Democratic Congresswomen for Not Wearing Flag Pins to the State of the Union, and It Backfired in the Most Trumpian Way

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 11: Donald Trump Jr. arrives for a ribbon cutting event for a new clubhouse at Trump Golf Links at Ferry Point, June 11, 2018 in The Bronx borough of New York City. According to President Donald Trump's latest financial disclosures, the Trump Organization oversees 17 golf courses and clubs, generating $221 million in revenue last year. Trump Golf Links at Ferry Point opened in 2015. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump's eldest son, Donald "Don" Jr. seems to despise Democrats almost as much as his father.

This was especially evident after Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, when Trump Jr. took to Twitter to criticize female Democratic Congresswomen for not wearing flag pins.


The American flag lapel pin came into national popularity with Richard Nixon as a statement against anti-Vietnam war protestors. Since then, it's warped into a flawed test for candidates and lawmakers to prove their patriotism. During the 2008 election, eventual President Barack Obama ended up on the receiving end of Republican outrage for not wearing the item. "I decided I won't wear that pin on my chest," he defended. "Instead I'm going to try to tell the American people what I believe... and hopefully that will be a testimony to my patriotism." Bill O'Reilly made a similar statement after 9/11: "I'm just a regular guy. Watch me and you'll know what I think without wearing a pin."

Yet Trump Jr. seems to think flag pins are the deciding factor of dedication to this country, which is interesting, because he wasn't wearing one himself, nor were any Trump family members.

People didn't hesitate to point this out.

Nor is this new.

They still weren't done eviscerating Trump Jr.

Many pointed out that flag pins are hardly a good indicator of patriotism or character.

And of course, the Russia Investigation—and Don Jr.'s meetings with Russian allies to get dirt on Hillary Clinton—inevitably arose.

Yikes.

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