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New Poll Finds People Overwhelmingly Associate Images of the Capitol Riots With the Republican Party

ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP via Getty Images

Ever since former President Donald Trump's lies about the 2020 election motivated a mob of pro-Trump extremists to storm the United States Capitol and undo now-President Joe Biden's victory, Republican elected officials have worked overtime to dismiss the riots' severity or deny altogether that it was prompted by Republican lies.

They've claimed the rioters, who ransacked windows and beat police officers and smeared excrement across the walls, looked like they were participating in a "normal tourist visit." Others have claimed the mob was secretly composed of anti-Trump activists who dressed up in pro-Trump gear to make him look bad—despite him already being defeated in the 2020 election. They've tried to divert attention from the riots and to violent moments in the overwhelmingly peaceful protests against racist police brutality last summer.

Most importantly, Republican members of Congress overwhelmingly voted against a bipartisan commission to investigate the origins of the riots.

But a new report indicates their tactics aren't working.

A recently released Navigator Research survey of 1,001 voters found a strong association of images of the failed insurrection with the Republican party among those surveyed.

According to the report:

"Three in five Americans (61%) associate an image of the Capitol riot with the Republican Party."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, 37 percent of Republicans who get their news from the conservative Fox News network associated the images with the Democratic party, despite the sea of Trump flags, caps, and shirts among the rioters.

Here's a full breakdown.


People reacted to the delusions of Republicans associating the riots with the Democratic party.



But the vast majority seem to be laying the blame at the feet of Republicans—and Donald Trump.




Others are still gripped by delusion.




The Democratic House of Representatives voted to establish a select House committee on the riots, after the bill for a bipartisan commission failed.