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Presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway may be one of President Donald Trump's most vocal defenders, but her husband—Republican lawyer George Conway—is decidedly not.

After months of speaking out against Trump on Twitter, Conway and three other prominent Republican strategists formed Project Lincoln late last year.

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Even the most powerful office on the planet requires a level of humility and a willingness to admit when something goes wrong. President Donald Trump didn't get that memo.

Whether it's on Obama, the "fake news media," traitorous Republicans, the impeachment "hoax," or anything within even the most laborious reach, Trump can always find some person or entity on whom to pass the blame.

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Despite numerous cautions from medical experts—including those on his staff—President Donald Trump continues to tout hydroxychloroquine as a promising treatment for the virus that's brought daily life in the United States to a standstill.

The drug has undergone no clinical trials to scientifically test its efficacy on the virus, and the evidence on its behalf is anecdotal at best. One Fox News guest, Access Health International Chairman William Haseltine, called it a "quack cure."

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As the pandemic that's caused a national health crisis continues to worsen, President Donald Trump has been unyielding as ever in his eagerness to spread misinformation. It's made for some tense moments between the President and reporters.

One of the President's most damaging lines of misinformation has been his endorsement of hydroxychloroquine, a drug typically used for malaria, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Trump has touted the drug—which hasn't undergone trials to treat the virus—as a possible cure.

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Given President Donald Trump's propensity for lying and his administration's constant misinformation regarding the current global pandemic, Americans across the country have become selective about which sources they deem as credible in seeking potentially lifesaving information in the face of a national health crisis.

Iowa's Republican governor, Kim Reynolds, is in stark disagreement with most Americans on whom to trust regarding measures designed to curb the virus.

Iowa is one of a few states that still has yet to issue a stay-at-home order to slow the virus's spread. Reynolds has resisted taking the step despite a unanimous recommendation from the Iowa Board of Medicine to do so.

National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) director Dr. Anthony Fauci recently said that all states should institute these orders.

Reynolds's response was...telling.

After calling stay-at-home orders a "divisive issue," the governor said:

"I would say that maybe [Fauci] doesn't have all the information"

Fauci has quickly become one of the most notable figures in the pandemic's response, and one of the few officials in President Donald Trump's virus task force that Americans widely trust to deliver accurate information. He's been an integral part of curbing health crises from the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States to Avian Flu to H1N1 and more.

If Fauci doesn't have all the information, then the country is—for lack of a better word—completely screwed.

People were appalled at the governor's defense.





It's safe to say that Fauci has more information and experience in these situations than any governor in the nation—including Reynolds.



The death toll in the United States from the virus recently surpassed 6000.

Information saves lives. Ignorance endangers them.

Samuel Corum/Getty Images // SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Even in the face of a national health crisis that threatens hundreds of thousands of American lives, President Donald Trump has consistently signaled that he's incapable of rising to the urgency of the moment, choosing instead to pick fights with governors over Twitter and to brag about the ratings of his press briefings.

That string of behavior continued with a letter to Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), which read more like one of the President's Twitter screeds than a letter from the President of the United States.

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images // Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The Trump campaign was roasted recently when it sent a cease and desist order to a PAC called Priority USA for using audio clips of Trump in an ad to highlight the numerous times he dismissed the virus that's caused a public health crisis in the United States.

Now, the campaign's attempt at revenge with a recent tweet may turn out to be ill advised.

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