Republican Representative Mia Love of Utah gives her concession speech, November 26, 2018. (KTVX/YouTube)

Twenty days after the midterm elections and some close races are just now being called. One of those is the race for 4th congressional district in Utah where Democrat Ben McAdams squared off against incumbent House Republican Mia Love.

Love becomes the only GOP House incumbent in Utah to have her district go from red to blue.

Keep reading...
Salma Hayek attends the European Premiere of "Beatriz At Dinner", the Opening Night screening of Sundance Film Festival: London 2017, at the May Fair Hotel on June 1, 2017 in London, England. (David M Benett/Dave Benett/WireImage)

Each winter season, over 40,000 film enthusiasts choose snow over sun as they travel to Park City, Utah, for the annual Sundance Film Festival – the largest independent film festival in the United States. The festival, which premiered in 1978 as an effort to attract more filmmakers to Utah, has since become a career capstone for independent filmmakers. Over the years, Sundance has earned the reputation of being a fundamental platform for more unusual, off-kilter and experimental films. Here is what to know about the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

Prepare for the cold.

Keep reading...
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch speaks during the Senate and House conference committee meeting on the tax bill at the United States Capitol in Washington, DC on December 12, 2017. (Photo by Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Just as he did with the wildly unpopular GOP tax bill that President Donald Trump signed into law last week, Utah Senator Orrin Hatch overlooked the fine print when he shared on Twitter that he is "grateful" to be honored by The Salt Lake Tribune as "Utahn of the Year." While the Tribune gives the designation to someone they recognize as having "the biggest impact," for Hatch, that impact was for the worst. In fact, the paper called for his retirement.

Keep reading...

Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) held a town hall in his home district last night and came under fire for resisting calls to investigate President Donald Trump's international business empire and its myriad conflicts of interest. As the chair of the House Oversight Committee, Chaffetz is perhaps the government official with the most power to check Trump's vast potential to use the executive office to enrich himself and his relatives. (Earlier this week, Chaffetz admitted that Trump would not let him discuss his ability to investigate the administration for breaching ethics. “Before my bum even hit the chair, the president said, ‘No oversight. You can’t talk about anything that has to do with oversight,’” Chaffetz said.)

More than 1,000 people showed up at the town hall in Cottonwood Heights, a Salt Lake City suburb, to question Chaffetz on his failure to investigate Trump. Chaffetz has not issued subpoenas, has not called for hearings, and scheduled no meetings to discuss the president's abuse of office. In fact, the 43 items on a proposed two-year agenda for the House Oversight Committee includes, according to Washington Post reporter Tom Hamburger, "a look at District of Columbia spending, cyber security policy at federal agencies and reform at the Office of Government Ethics, which had previously been critical of Trump’s failure to divest himself of potential conflicts."

Keep reading...

President Barack Obama moved yesterday to preserve the Bears Ears area in southwest Utah, designating 1.35 million acres of the American West a national monument. In a statement, Obama said that the Bears Ears monument––named for its distinctive pair of buttes––would "protect some of the country's most significant natural, cultural and archaeological resources, including important ancestral grounds for numerous tribes."

"Today's actions will help protect this cultural legacy and will ensure that future generations are able to enjoy and appreciate these scenic and historic landscapes," Obama continued.

Keep reading...

[DIGEST: MSNBC, The Salt Lake Tribune, US News, Reuters]

Late last month, Utah’s pro-life governor signed into law a bill that requires doctors to administer anesthesia to women having an abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy or later. The bill requires anesthesia not for the mother’s pain, but for the fetus’s purported pain, based on the unproven premise that fetuses can feel pain at 20 weeks, despite scientific research finding it unlikely that fetuses have capacity to feel pain until the third trimester. Utah’s law previously required that doctors offer anesthesia to women at 20 weeks, but did not mandate its use.

Keep reading...

[DIGEST: CNN, NY Daily News]

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert (R) plans to sign two pieces of legislation to combat “a sexually toxic environment” caused by pornography; the signing will take place at the Utah State Capitol at 10 AM Tuesday.

Keep reading...