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On Tuesday, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton debuted a longshot effort to validate outgoing President Donald Trump's lies that widespread voter fraud tipped the 2020 election to President-elect Joe Biden.

Paxton sued the swing states of Pennsylvania, Georgia, Wisconsin, and Michigan on behalf of Texas. Because the suit is between states across a variety of regions, it will head straight to the Supreme Court. The Court has not yet announced whether it will hear the case.

The suit doesn't argue that widespread fraud took place, but that changes to voting procedures in the defendant states rendered any fraud that could have occurred undetectable. Trump's own Attorney General, William Barr, has said the Justice Department could not find evidence of voter fraud impactful enough to change the outcome of the election.

Nevertheless, 17 states so far have filed motions supporting the suit.

Trump supporters in other states are pressuring their attorneys general to join as well in hopes of bolstering the case, but Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh made clear to one such supporter that his state would not be joining.

Frosh decried the case as "a cesspool of disproved charges, wild speculation, insupportable arguments and silly gibberish."

This is in line with most of the evaluations by experts. Even one of Texas' own Republican Senators—John Cornyn—said he struggled to "understand the legal theory of it."

People agreed with Frosh's assessment of the suit.






Others keep poking holes in the merits of the Texas suit, including the motion to intervene in the case issued by the President.



Expert after expert has said the suit is almost certain to fail.