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Anti-Choice GOP Candidate Confronted Over Paying For Girlfriend's Abortion—And Things Got Awkward

GOP Colorado congresstional candidate Richard Holtorf tried to defend paying for his girlfriend's abortion even as he votes against that choice for other women.

Kyle Clark; Richard Holtorf
Next 9NEWS

Colorado journalist Kyle Clark gave a masterclass in dealing with Republican hypocrisy on Next With Kyle Clark on metro Denver's KUSA 9NEWS.

Current Colorado state Representative and Republican House congressional candidate Richard Holtorf was put in the hot seat over his pro-forced birth hypocrisy. Holtorf has made his opposition to reproductive freedom a key part of his campaign while also stating the abortion he paid for was the right choice for his former girlfriend.

Clark asked Holtorf why—if he believes no pregnant person has a right to make their own choices or follow proven medical procedures—he encouraged his girlfriend to get an abortion.

You can watch the moment here:

Holtorf claims to be a pro-lifer, but proudly admits he impregnated two different girlfriends while a single, younger man. In the story Holtorf shared in January, one girlfriend chose adoption while the other chose an abortion, which Holtorf funded.

He said at the time:

"I respected her rights and actually gave her money to help her through her important, critical time."

9NEWS correspondent Clark asked the GOP candidate:

"If abortion was the best choice for your girlfriend, why try to deny that choice to other women?"

Holtorf was never able to produce a cogent—clear, logical, convincing—response.

After some rhetoric, Holtorf finally said:

"Did she have that right? Yes. Was it my choice, Kyle? No."

Clark started to ask:

"Why do you seek to deny the choice that you said was best for your girlfriend’s life?"

But Holtorf interrupted, saying:

"Let me finish explaining..."

Undeterred, Clark steered Holtorf back to the original question again.

"Why do you seek to deny it to other women?"

Holtorf claimed:

"...[As] a pro-life person... you should try to choose life every time. But there are exceptions. And there are times when you need abortion. Abortion is a medical procedure."

Clark countered:

"Is one of the exceptions when Richard Holtorf’s the father?"

Holtorf—who made his story public in January—responded:

"It’s not about me. Don’t personalize it and make it about me."

When Clark reminded Holtorf he was the one who spoke about his girlfriend’s abortion on the floor of the Colorado House, the Republican candidate claimed it was unimportant.

Holtorf said:

"That doesn’t matter. That’s a story. That’s not that important. What’s more important is the policy."

People across social media called out Holtorf’s pro-forced birth stance for what it was—typical Republican "rules for thee, not for me" hypocrisy.

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Many had high praise for Clark's prowess as an interviewer and journalist.

Several requested he even move to a national platform.

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Holtorf—along with five other Republicans—is facing off against GOP Representative Lauren Boebert in the Republican primary for Colorado's 4th congressional district seat. Boebert switched to the 4th district after abysmal poll numbers in her current congressional district—Colorado's 3rd.

The Republican and Democratic primaries to determine who will be on November's ballot are both slated for Tuesday, June 25.

Three Democratic candidates—Trisha Calvarese, Ike McCorkle, and John Padora Jr.—are facing off to decide who will try to turn the seat from red to blue in November.

The seat is currently vacant after Republican incumbent Representative Ken Buck resigned on March 22, 2024 citing his party's "insidious narratives breed widespread cynicism and erode Americans' confidence in the rule of law."