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Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies to the Senate Judiciary Committee during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

After revealing more details from a credible allegation of sexual misconduct by controversial Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, The New York Times found themselves needing to apologize for their social media promotion of the breaking story. The Times was promoting The Education of Brett Kavanaugh: An Investigation by New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly.

On Sunday, the editorial division of the newspaper—The New York Times Opinion—under their account @nytopinion posted a tweet characterizing sexual misconduct as "harmless fun." The article the tweet promoted was an excerpt from the book focused on Deborah Ramirez's experiences with Kavanaugh at Yale.

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MSNBC

Justice Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination to replace the late Justice Anthony Kennedy was thrown into uncertainty last year when Dr. Christine Blasey-Ford came forward with sexual assault allegations against him.

Democrats were ultimately unsuccessful in blocking Kavanaugh's confirmation and he now sits on the Supreme Court.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images // Thomas Trutschel/Getty Images

Some Apple users are pursuing an antitrust lawsuit against the company for its 30% commission on apps featured in the online App Store.

In Apple v. Pepper, Apple argued that only app developers had the right to sue the company—since the commission comes from developer profits. However, consumers argued that the commission is passed on to them in the form of higher app prices.

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@ScottWalker/Twitter, @arlenparsa/Twitter

Scott Walker, Wisconsin's former Republican Governor, tweeted a picture of himself wearing jeans on Wednesday in solidarity with Denim Day, an international campaign to raise awareness about sexual assault.

"In support of sexual assault victims, I’m wearing jeans on ," Walker wrote.

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Chuck Todd and Rudy Giuliani in an episode of NBC's "Meet the Press" in August 2018. (NBC News/YouTube)

Back in August of this year President Donald Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani appeared on NBC's Meet the Press. In an interview with Chuck Todd, things went a bit sideways. The two men were discussing if Trump should speak to Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Giuliani said:

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WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 30: United States Supreme Court (Front L-R) Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Jr., (Back L-R) Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Elena Kagan and Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh pose for their official portrait at the in the East Conference Room at the Supreme Court building November 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. Earlier this month, Chief Justice Roberts publicly defended the independence and integrity of the federal judiciary against President Trump after he called a judge who had ruled against his administration’s asylum policy “an Obama judge.” “We do not have Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges,” Roberts said in a statement. “What we have is an extraordinary group of dedicated judges doing their level best to do equal right to those appearing before them. That independent judiciary is something we should all be thankful for.” (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The United States Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear a case to block funding for Planned Parenthood, upholding previous rulings from two lower courts.

In 2014, Planned Parenthood sued the Center for Medical Progress, an anti-abortion group that produced fake videos of supposed Planned Parenthood officials talking about selling fetal body parts.

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Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testifies during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo By Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images)

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford was a professor of psychology at Palo Alto University living a fairly normal life with her family. Then on September 19, 2018, her world changed drastically.

Dr. Blasey Ford's name hit the media as the previously unnamed accuser of Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court seat vacated by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.

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