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When a high profile figure acts unlawfully or despicably, those who patronize their work often make the personal choice to revoke their support. These figures sometimes lose jobs, sponsorships, fame, or social media platforms.

While many see this as basic accountability, the Republican party is betting on demonizing these consequences to boost their standing in the upcoming 2022 midterms. They've deemed it "cancel culture."

When Twitter, a private company, deplatformed former President Donald Trump after the election lies he spewed on the platform led to a deadly insurrection? Cancel culture.

When Trump was impeached for inciting said insurrection? Cancel culture.

When Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) was stripped of her committee assignments for her past support of deranged conspiracy theories and for the execution of her colleagues? Cancel culture.

When Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) faced backlash for escaping to Cancún for a beachside vacation as his constituents endured freezing temperatures with no electricity, heat, or water? Cancel culture.

What were once basic consequences for poor choices have now been labeled part of a phenomenon by many in the GOP to bypass accountability and evade valid criticism.

Far-right Congressman Jim Jordan (R-OH) recently said cancel culture is the "most dangerous thing happening in the country today."

Now, Fox News anchor Bill Hemmer claims that soon religious figures—or "Bible characters"—will be next on the imaginary chopping block.

Watch below.

Hemmer was discussing a recent initiative in Chicago that would evaluate the city's monuments to better understand the implications of publicly pedestalizing them. Among these monuments are former American Presidents who promoted genocide and owned slaves.

Hemmer said of the initiative:

"I tell you, if they start cancelling these American Presidents, they're gonna come after Bible characters next. Mark my words."

Twitter responded with mockery of biblical proportions.






People scoffed that this was coming from the "news" division of the conservative Fox News network, rather than its primetime opinion programming.



It's unclear which "Bible characters" Hemmer thinks are up for cancellation.