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Despite assurances from President Donald Trump, there is not yet a cure for the pandemic that's caused a health crisis upending daily life across the United States.

In his attempts to assure the public that he has everything under control, the President made some wild claims about potential treatments for the disease.

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President Donald Trump is determined to build as much of his long-promised border wall as possible before the 2020 election—even if it means destroying sacred land.

Trump-hired contractors are currently working on a portion of the wall in southern Arizona, where they've been detonating controlled blasts at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in the Sonoran Desert.

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President Donald Trump speaks at the Galt House on August 21, 2019 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Historically, an incumbent president running for re-election is all but guaranteed their party's nomination. But like some other more controversial presidents, Donald Trump is facing a primary challenge -- in fact two: former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld and former Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh—for the GOP nomination in 2020.

Or is he?

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Mike Moore/Getty Images for Leisure Opportunities; Nike

Different symbols mean different things to different people. Unfortunately, a symbol can become coopted to represent hate. So it was with the swastika, a symbol once used in Asia and the Americas but largely abandoned after becoming the emblem of the Nazi party in the early 20th century.

White supremacists in the United States also coopted symbols as emblems of their hate groups. One such symbol is the "Betsy Ross" flag. Created around the time of the American Revolution, it is now used as a symbol by some White supremacists like the Confederate battle flag.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images (left); Nogales International (right)

The City Council in Nogales, a small Arizona border city, passed a resolution threatening to sue the federal government should it fail to remove all concertina wire installed within the city limits.

The council's resolution says the barbed wire on the border wall, which runs through the downtown area, “is only found in a war, prison or battle setting” and would harm or kill any person or animal that might attempt to scale it.

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The Yuma, Navajo, Apache and Maricopa County Republican parties filed a lawsuit last night to challenge Arizona's mail-in ballot-counting procedures. The groups "are challenging the way counties verify signatures on mail-in ballots that are dropped off at the polls on Election Day," according to the Arizona Republic.

Election officials have begun to tally more than 600,000 outstanding votes in the race between Republican Representative Martha McSally and Democratic Representative Kyrstin Sinema, who are both vying to replace retiring Senator Jeff Flake.

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Kathy Brandon, the director of STARBASE, and Kathryn Doherty, the military liaison and military director for Congressman John Fleming, observe an introduction to the science lab for 5th grade students at STARBASE on Barksdale Air Force Base, La. The 307th Bomb Wing sponsored STARBASE was one of many stops for Doherty during a base tour on August 10, 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Dachelle Melville/Released)

If the GOP gets its way in Arizona, students at public and charter schools will no longer learn about evolution in science class. A new draft revision of state science standards replaces the scientific term “evolution” in the curriculum with the phrase “theory of evolution,” which serves to diminish its relevance and dismiss the vast body of evidence that supports it.

The proposed new standards address the origins of life in its Life Sciences section: “The theory of evolution seeks to make clear the unity and diversity of living and extinct organisms,” says the document, which was developed by more than 100 teachers, parents and community members, but then revised, allegedly to the liking of State Superintendent of Education Diane Douglas. Many of the revisions can be seen as visible corrections on the draft.

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