oh-myyy-ribbon

This Guy Taught an AI to Draw Nudes and the Results Are the Thing of Nightmares TBH

Artificial intelligence has made many advances of late — translating animal language, for instance, or writing the next Game of Thrones. However, the world may have to wait a few more years for AI-created nude paintings, if a recent project is any indication of the technology’s aesthetic.

Robbie Barrat, a recent high school graduate from West Virginia and AI enthusiast, used a type of artificial intelligence called a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) to scan thousands of nude paintings from WikiArt. Using two neural networks, a generator and a discriminator, the GAN essentially mimics distribution of data — from images and music to speech — to create its own versions.


Barrat’s experiment did not go well.

“The GAN didn't successfully learn how to make realistic nude portraits,” Barrat, 18, told Vice. “The discriminator part of the GAN isn't really able to tell the difference between blobs of flesh and humans, and once the generator realized it could keep feeding the discriminator blobs of flesh, and fool it this way, both networks just stopped learning how to paint more realistically.”

In short, instead of sensuous curves and limbs, the AI kicked out what looked like birth-defected victims of herbicidal warfare as painted by Salvador Dali. Gizmodo described them as “terrifying pools of melting flesh,” while IFL Science! deemed them “the least sexy thing you’ll ever see.”

It raises the question of whether appreciation of naked human bodies would ever — or could ever — be grasped by AI.

“Usually the machine just paints people as blobs of flesh with tendrils and limbs randomly growing out — I think it's really surreal,” Barrat tweeted. “I wonder if that's how machines see us.”

[embed][/embed]

Further attempts were equally amorphous, although quite stunning in their own way:

Barrat maintains hope that, with further training and input, the GAN could eventually create something more Venus de Milo than Ripley’s Believe It or Not!

"The generator tries to come up with paintings that fool the discriminator, and the discriminator tries to learn how to tell the difference between real paintings from the dataset and fake paintings the generator feeds it," Barrat told CNET. "They both get better and better at their jobs over time, so the longer the GAN is trained, the more realistic the outputs will be."

In the meantime, GAN AI is proving to be useful in realms beyond image enhancement and production, from cybersecurity to — less fortunately — creating fake news. However, given that the technology has only been around for four years or so, its potential is far from being realized.

“Imagine in a hundred years when AI can create infinities of staggering artworks, symphonies, cuisines, and novels in the blink of an eye,” said Twitter user Yosef Mama in response to Barrat’s late-March tweet of some of the AI’s creations. “It will force humans to reconsider what they call art and push its boundaries ever more ferociously.”

[embed][/embed]

Blaze TV

Continuing a steady slide to the right since her tenure as President Donald Trump's United Nations ambassador, former South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley is under heat for recent comments regarding the Confederate flag.

The comments came during an interview with far-Right Blaze TV host Glenn Beck.

Keep reading... Show less
Fox News

Former Vice President and current 2020 Presidential candidate Joe Biden erupted at a man during an Iowa town hall who accused him of actively working to get his son Hunter a board position on the Ukrainian energy company Burisma Holdings. Biden called the man a "damn liar" before challenging him to pushups.

Republicans seized on the moment as an opportunity to discredit Biden as a candidate, but Fox and Friends cohost Ainsley Earhardt's reaction may be the most deluded yet.

Keep reading... Show less
Bryan Woolston/Getty Images // @parscale/Twitter

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) has repeatedly made clear that, after President Donald Trump solicited Ukrainian leaders to announce investigations that personally benefitted him, the decision to launch impeachment proceedings wasn't a political maneuver, but a constitutional mandate.

The move came after years of Trump's supporters, as well as some critics, insisted that impeachment would be political suicide for the Democrats.

Since shortly after the inquiry's announcement in September, support for impeachment outweighed its oppositon as more revelations surfaced of Trump's dealings with Ukraine, but his 2020 campaign manager Brad Parscale attempted to show that Pelosi's move to impeach would lose Democrats their House majority.

Keep reading... Show less
CNN

Shortly after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) announced that representatives would begin drafting articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy took the podium to defend the President and the Republican party as a whole.

It could've gone better.

Keep reading... Show less
SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images // MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

One day after the House Judiciary Committee's hearing on impeachment, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) held a press conference announcing that the House would begin drafting articles of impeachment, with a possible floor vote as soon as Christmas.

The press conference signaled the beginning of the end of the impeachment inquiry in the House.

Keep reading... Show less
Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee, in its public impeachment hearing against President Donald Trump on Wednesday, consulted four constitutional scholars for greater insight to the legal implications of the President's Ukraine scandal—and whether they merit impeachment.

Three witnesses, called by Democrats, each made compelling arguments for the articles of impeachment with which Trump could be charged.

George Washington University professor Jonathan Turley—invited by Republicans—was the lone dissenter.

Keep reading... Show less