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Christine Blasey Ford's Lawyer Contacted the Senate Judiciary Committee to Negotiate a Time for Her to Testify, and Kavanaugh Just Weighed In

US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh listens during the first day of his confirmation hearing in front of the US Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, on September 4, 2018. - Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

After a whirlwind of speculation on whether Dr. Christine Blasey Ford would testify in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee on sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, an email from Ford's attorney Debra Katz may have given an answer. Katz said in the email to the Senate Judiciary Committee that Ford still wishes to testify, but negotiations would have to be made to ensure the safety of her client, who has suffered harassment and death threats after coming forward. Katz insisted that those assurances couldn't be secured adequately before Monday.

Initially, Ford was open to testifying then requested an FBI investigation of the allegations before facing questions from the committee. According to Katz, it is still Ford's "strong preference" that an investigation be conducted, but it appears Ford may be amenable to testifying without it if other conditions are met.


While the FBI investigation may not occur, Katz demanded on behalf of her client that the hearing previously scheduled for Monday be moved back to ensure Ford's safety.

"A hearing on Monday is not possible and the Committee's insistence that it occur then is arbitrary in any event."

Hours later, Kavanaugh himself sent a letter to the committee reiterating his desire to testify and "clear [his] name."

"Thank you for the invitation to appear before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary on Monday, September 24. I will be there. I look forward to the opportunity to testify before the Committee."
"I continue to want a hearing as soon as possible, so that I can clear my name."

Katz's statement highlights a point that Democrats have made in regards to the Committee Republicans' rush to confirm Kavanaugh to the court. It's undoubtedly ideal for Republicans to confirm Kavanaugh before the 2018 midterms, when the legislature could shift in Democrats' favor and jeopardize the Supreme Court appointment.

However, lawmakers and citizens alike are pointing out that this doesn't justify a rush to confirm him to a lifetime post.

Before the possibility of a hearing next week was put back on the table, Democrats were adamant that an FBI investigation was necessary.

For Republicans, an investigation was out of the question.

This is despite the fact that the FBI is responsible for conducting background checks for such positions as a Supreme Court seat. The FBI reopened the investigation of now-Justice Clarence Thomas when Anita Hill came forward with allegations of sexual harassment against him in 1991. Republicans claim that an FBI investigation of Kavanaugh is just a tactic for Democrats to delay his confirmation, but the investigation prompted by Hill only took three days.

Additionally, many Americans are pointing out that these allegations are serious and deserve to be investigated to the fullest extent.

Others are saying an investigation is merited because there are people like Mark Judge (who witnessed the event) and Cristina King Miranda, who claims to have heard of the alleged assault at school in the days following.

It's unclear whether an FBI investigation will happen or if the Senate Judiciary Committee will proceed without it. Regardless, it's likely the public won't know by Monday.