WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 01: U.S. President Donald Trump participates in a meeting with leaders of the steel industry at the White House March 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. Trump announced planned tariffs on imported steel and aluminum during the meeting, with details to be released at a later date. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The Republican National Convention isn't until August of next year but President Donald Trump's racist rhetoric is already leaving a sour impression on the event's host city.

In the wake of the president's racist tweets to four Democratic congresswomen, the city council of Charlotte, North Carolina voted 9-2 to rebuke Trump for his divisive language in a proposal featuring a litany of Trump's racist and xenophobic remarks from the past three years to as recently as last week.

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Over the last two months, Texas Governor Greg Abbott has signed two bills that will egregiously affect the lives of LGBTQ children and adults in the state of Texas. These two bills are just the tip of the iceberg. According to LGBT advocates, as many as 25 to 30 anti-LGBT bills have been proposed in the Texas legislature.

Most recently, the Republican governor signed House Bill 3859, which makes it legal to refuse adoptive rights to qualified Texans based on their sexual or gender identity, their faith or marital status—i.e., not only are single parents at risk, but so are married couples where either partner was previously divorced. The bill would allow adoption agencies to tout religious objection to deny placement to any prospective parent. It also allows welfare agencies to refuse to provide certain kinds of care to a child based on the provider’s religious beliefs. In essence, it sanctions discrimination against LGBTQ couples who hope to adopt. Further, it gives child placement agencies that are beneficiaries of taxpayer money the power to claim “religious objections to certain groups of people—effectively giving them a license to deny adoption and fostering opportunities to LGBTQ, single, or non-Christian parents.”

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[DIGEST: Huffington Post, New York Times]

Donald Trump accepted the Republican presidential nomination at the close of the Republican National Convention Thursday night, and his incendiary politics provided Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders all the ammunition he needed to lambast Trump, who, he asserts, "has made bigotry and divisiveness the cornerstone of his campaign."

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[DIGEST: Gawker, Jezebel]

Melania Trump delivered the headlining speech at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last night––and at least one entire section was lifted from Michelle Obama’s speech at the 2008 Democratic National Convention.

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[DIGEST: New York Times, Time, Wall Street Journal]

Republicans gathered in Cleveland on Tuesday to draft the party’s principles platform ahead of the Republican National Convention, and the final document is a sign that the party has shifted even further to the right. Much of the language emphasizes the party’s staunchly conservative attitude toward gay rights and its insistence that the Bible and God be present in the classroom while incorporating some of Donald Trump’s most extreme campaign pledges, including the building of a wall along the border with Mexico.

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With the Republican National Convention less than two weeks away, Donald Trump is set to name his vice president. Those close to Trump have suggested that the decision may occur later this week.

Trump has alternated between coy and unusually public during this intensive vetting period. He has appeared on stage with some of the presumptive frontrunners, and tweeted to stoke anticipation about meeting with others.

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[DIGEST: Time, CNN]

A new amendment by the GOP Rules Committee could provide delegates a way out of voting for Trump on the first ballot. The proposal would grant delegates “conscientious objector” status, which would free them from their pledge to vote as the result of primaries and caucuses. The measure would redefine the “faithless delegate” rule enacted at the previous convention to afford delegates “a vote of conscience, whether personal or religious.”

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