Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images

President Donald Trump's former Chief of Staff, retired General John Kelly had some strong critiques for his former boss in recent remarks at the Drew University Forum lecture series.

General Kelly responded to Trump firing Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman, who was ousted from the National Security Council after complying with a Congressionally approved subpoena to testify about the President's dealings with Ukraine. Vindman's brother—an NSC lawyer—was fired as well, despite playing no part in the impeachment proceedings.

Keep reading...
Leon Neal/Getty Images

Retired General John Kelly served as President Donald Trump's Chief of Staff until late 2018, and now he's siding against Trump on a crucial point.

Former National Security Advisor John Bolton's allegations in his upcoming memoir have rocked the impeachment trial in the Senate. Bolton claims Trump sought to withhold aid from Ukraine until it acquiesced to performing politically beneficial investigations for Trump's reelection bid.

Keep reading...
TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump (R) shakes hands with newly sworn-in White House Chief of Staff John Kelly at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 31, 2017. US President Trump on July 28, 2017 announced via Twitter that he had picked Kelly to replace outgoing chief of staff Reince Priebus, rumored for weeks to be on the verge of being sacked. The chief of staff traditionally manages the president's schedule and is the highest ranking White House employee, deciding who has access to the president. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump's immigration policies have sickened Americans across the country, but the companies operating the detention centers where undocumented migrants are housed have been reaping the benefits.

Now, General John Kelly—President Donald Trump's former Chief of Staff—will join the board of Caliburn International. The company operates the country's largest detention center for unaccompanied migrant children.

Keep reading...
Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Donald Trump instructed John Kelly, his former chief of staff, to "fire" his children from the White House after complaining that his daughter Ivanka and his son-in-law Jared Kushner “didn’t know how to play the game," according to Kushner Inc., a new book by journalist Vicky Ward. The president said the two kept generating negative media coverage.

It had been Kelly who said firing them would look bad, so he decided to make life difficult for the two in the hope that they would resign on their own. The plan backfired. They are still there. Kelly, however, resigned from the White House in December.

Keep reading...
Drew Angerer/Getty Images, Win McNamee/Getty Images

Since his departure from the White House in December, former Chief of Staff John Kelly has stayed out of the spotlight. That changed on Wednesday when the four-star general let loose about his experience working for President Donald Trump.

In an interview at Duke University, Kelly knocked his former post as the “the least enjoyable job” he ever had, though he conceded it was the most important.

Keep reading...
White House chief of staff John Kelly listens as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a briefing with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House October 5, 2017 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images)

Ever since news broke that White House Chief of Staff John Kelly would step down at the end of 2018, people speculated who would replace him. Then when President Donald Trump's first choice for a replacement—Nick Ayers who currently serves as Vice President Mike Pence's Chief of Staff—announced he also would leave government service at the end of the year, people began throwing out suggestions.

Now the New York Daily News weighed in. Their front page for Tuesday featured a help wanted notice with some very specific qualifications.

Keep reading...

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly has reportedly instituted a schedule block for President Donald Trump, complementing the "executive time" the Commander-in-Chief already enjoys on a daily basis.

Politico's Annie Karni tweeted on Tuesday that "policy time" will now be given to the president so he can reflect on the immediate issues facing the administration.

Keep reading...