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Mississippi gubernatorial candidate and Tea Party Republican Robert Foster is in hot water after refusing to let a local female reporter shadow his campaign unless a male colleague was present.

People immediately began accusing Foster of sexism for denying professional, talented women reporters equal access to his campaign on the basis of their sex.

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Fox News

In an effort to explain away climate change on his Fox News program, conservative host Tucker Carlson asked:

"How did we wind up with a country in which feminists do science?"

Watch his comment here.

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The tattoo in question. (Credit: Estela Martin.)

Estela Martín was testing her swimming skills during an entrance exam for the Spanish army when a male examiner noticed a black lotus flower tattooed on the upper part of her right foot. She was told she could not complete the exam because the tattoo was visible, and that it would be particularly obvious were she to wear a skirt.

The Spanish army’s rules no longer required women to don skirts, however, and Ms. Martín was fully aware of this change in policy, which was re-solidified after her expulsion. The tattoo was not visible when Ms. Martín wore trousers — her typical choice of wardrobe during her service — and she argued she was within regulations, but the examiner refused to budge in his steadfastness against her tattoo, insisting she could one day receive orders to wear a skirt.

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Katherine Johnson (center), Caroline Waterlow (left) and Ezra Edelman (right) at the 89th Annual Academy Awards on February 26, 2017 (Tyler Golden/Getty Images)

For a girl who loved to count everything, you might expect Katherine G. Johnson to be grateful that she was alive to count her 99th year. It’s not every day that a civilian gets honored by NASA, as Johnson was last month as the space agency opened the Katherine G. Johnson Computational Research Facility in Hampton, Virginia.

But you would be wrong. When asked pointedly about the distinction bestowed upon her for playing such a pivotal role in the American space program, the nonagenarian didn’t know what to make of the hoopla.

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[DIGEST: Glamour, New York Times]

President Barack Obama is the first sitting president to declare himself a feminist. He made the declaration in an essay he wrote for Glamour to celebrate his 55th birthday, concluding with the rallying cry, "when everybody is equal, we are all more free."

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twentys

[DIGEST: Politico, The Independent]

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew will announce plans to replace President Andrew Jackson with famed abolitionist Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. This is not the only change: leaders of the women’s suffrage movement will be featured on the back of the $10 bill and there are plans to feature civil rights era leaders on the back of the $5 bill. Jackson may not be completely removed from the $20 bill; it is likely he will still appear on the back.

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Who is the archetypal American single mother? Is she a divorced professional who juggles motherhood and a stressful career in a frenzied attempt to “have it all”? Or is she a young, unwed mother, unemployed and welfare-bound? The truth is, there is no archetypal single mother, regardless of what entertainment and media would have us believe. These two familiar extremes ignore the myriad ways in which women become single mothers, as well as the diversity of the women themselves. What about single mothers who happen to be lesbians, or women of color, or working class women? Those characters, and their struggles, aren't easily found on prime-time TV sitcoms or among book club selections.

Staceyann Chin is a multitasking single mother. When I first spoke with her, she was standing at the curb in front of her Brooklyn apartment building, one arm reaching out to hail a taxi to pick up her daughter, the other holding her phone to her ear. Sound familiar?

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