Yesterday, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that lawsuits against Kim Davis could proceed. The decision overturned a lower court that had thrown out three lawsuits filed by same-sex couples who were denied marriage licenses by the county clerk.

Kim Davis became a right-wing figurehead when she refused to issue marriage licenses in Rowan County, Kentucky in 2015 after the Supreme Court decision that made same-sex marriage legal. Davis opposes same-sex marriage for religious reasons. She was jailed for contempt of court after refusing to follow a judge's orders.


David Ermold and David Moore and two other couples sued Davis and the county for damages. Ermold said of Davis, "As a person, she is free to believe and worship as she chooses. As a county clerk ... you have a responsibility to the people of your county."

U.S. District Judge David Bunning had declared the lawsuits moot because of a law change. In 2016, the Kentucky legislature had marriage licenses amended to allow a deputy clerk to sign the forms. Following that switch, one of Davis's deputies issued marriage licenses in Rowan County, ending the standoff with Davis.

Bunning wrote, "In light of these proceedings, and in view of the fact that the marriage licenses continue to be issued without incident, there no longer remains a case or controversy before the court."

A three-judge panel ruled that Bunning needed to review the case,  saying, "The district court concluded that because Ermold and Moore were eventually issued a marriage license, the dispute in their case was resolved. We conclude that the district court’s characterization of this case as simply contesting the ‘no marriage licenses’ policy is inaccurate because Ermold and Moore did not seek an injunction, they sought only damages. This action is not a general challenge to Davis’s policy, but rather seeks damages for a particularized harm allegedly suffered by a specific set of plaintiffs.”

This ruling means that the suits can move forward. Ermold and Moore's attorney has argued that the couple's rights were violated and suffered emotional distress as a result of Davis's actions. He said, "That doesn't go away because the office in Rowan County started issuing licenses to same-sex couples. That doesn't mean we weren't damaged by the constitutional violation that happened months earlier. That's what this case is about."

The decision comes as reports surfaced that President Donald Trump will issue an executive order on "religious liberty" on Thursday, the National Day of Prayer. The order is reportedly similar to laws signed by Vice President Mike Pence when he was governor of Indiana. According to the Nation, a leaked draft of the order "seeks to create wholesale exemptions for people and organizations who claim religious or moral objections to same-sex marriage, premarital sex, abortion, and trans identity, and it seeks to curtail women’s access to contraception and abortion through the Affordable Care Act."

Erik Voake/Getty Images for Hulu via Getty Images // Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Amendment 4—a Florida referendum restoring voting rights to former felons—passed in 2018 with 65% of the vote, paving the way for an additional 1.4 million voters in the swing state.

Republican Governor Ron DeSantis immediately took steps to undermine the public will by signing into law a bill that would only restore voting rights to felons who fully pay all fees and fines imposed after leaving prison.

Under Florida law, court debts left unpaid after three months are referred to private debt collectors, who can then tack on a surcharge of up to 40%.

Keep reading...
John Sommers II/Getty Images

A day after Senators took an oath of impartiality in the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump, the President eagerly announced the team of lawyers who will be defending him.

Two names on the list stood out.

Keep reading...

Now that the impeachment articles have been transferred to the U.S. Senate and Senators have been sworn in as jurors, Donald Trump's Senate impeachment trial is officially underway.

And while it's adjourned for the long weekend, the White House just announced their legal team, and it's a doozy.

In addition to lead attorneys Pat Cipollone and Jay Sekulow, Trump's legal team will consist of five additional lawyers who are expected to have speaking roles on the Senate floor throughout the trial:

  • Robert Ray
  • Alan Dershowitz
  • Ken Starr
  • Jane Raskin
  • Pam Bondi
Yep, you read that right, Ken Starr, of Clinton impeachment infamy.

And none other than Monica Lewinsky herself weighed in with a reaction that was relatable AF:

Many were here for it and had Lewinsky's back.





But doesn't that sentiment pretty much define every day?



And how is that going to. go for Starr?

Fair:

Can we make this happen, please?


Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

"Promises made, promises kept" is one of President Donald Trump's most repeated campaign slogans, but according to the Washington Post, those might just be empty words.

In 2016, the Post launched the Trump Promise Tracker, which kept a record of the 280+ promises Trump made during the campaign. As the end of his first term draws nearer and nearer, the Post has been updating the tracker of which promises Trump has kept since his election.

Keep reading...
Fox News

Far-right television personality Sean Hannity is a crucial part of Fox News' evening efforts to spin reality in favor of President Donald Trump.

On Wednesday night, that required Hannity to dismiss Lev Parnas, the right hand man of the President's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani.

Keep reading...
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Maine's senior Senator, Republican Susan Collins, trended on Twitter Wednesday.

But with the reason why, Collins' 2020 senatorial campaign probably wished she hadn't.

Keep reading...