Reporter's 'Star Wars' Themed Tweet Mocking the AP for Its Questionable 'Fact Check' of the Government Funding Impasse Is So Perfect It Hurts

Yesterday, The Associated Press tweeted a fact-check of President Donald Trump's presidential address which frustrated many on social media.

In a tweet, the AP blamed both Democrats and President Trump for the government shutdown, now in its third week.


The tweet frustrated many who accused the publication of victim blaming and noted that Republicans still had the majority in both houses of Congress at the time the shutdown began. And then Kate Aronoff, a contributing writer with The Intercept, swooped in with an analogy sure to please millions of Star Wars fans.

In short, Darth Vader was solely responsible for the destruction of the planet Alderaan. (There was some disagreement about whether Grand Moff Tarkin––who gave the order while Vader restrained Leia––was actually responsible, but Aronoff's point still stood.)

Many found her analogy quite apt and provided some snarkiness of their own.

Now in its twentieth day, the shutdown is the second longest in U.S. history, and there is no end in sight. The inauguration of the 116th Congress last week marks the first time ever that a federal shutdown will extend into two different Congresses.

The president’s response to the shutdown has been widely criticized. He’s claimed since the shutdown, which kicked off last month after he declined to sign a stopgap funding bill because he disagreed with the decision of Congress not to provide the funding he’d requested for his proposed border wall, is a ploy orchestrated by Democrats.

The president’s insistence on blaming Democrats for the shutdown contradicts his own statements. In December, he preemptively accepted ownership of a then-possible shutdown.

“I am proud to shut down the government for border security, Chuck. … I will take the mantle. I will be the one to shut it down. I’m not going to blame you for it,” he told Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer in the Oval Office on December 11.

The president's contentious address on border security two nights ago has also been derided as one based on lies and racism.

The president emphasized the need for a wall along our nation’s southern border, suggesting at one point that it was morally imperative.

“Some have suggested a barrier is immoral. Then why do wealthy politicians build walls, fences and gates around their homes?” he said. “They don’t build walls because they hate the people on the outside, but because they love the people on the inside.”

The president has not budged on his reasons for the shutdown, and it's safe to expect more Star Wars analogies in our future.

C-SPAN

Late last year, the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump on two articles:

  • Abuse of Power
  • Obstruction of Congress

Trump's allies have railed against both articles, but the obstruction of Congress charge has come under particular focus.

During its initial investigation, the House committees overseeing impeachment requested documents and witnesses from the White House, the State Department, and the Office of Management and Budget that would help get to the bottom of just what the deal was with Ukraine's foreign policy.

When they denied the House's request, the House subpoenaed the departments for the evidence. Claiming executive privilege, their subpoenas went ignored.

Keep reading...
CNN // David Corio/Redferns via Getty Images

House Impeachment Managers and President Donald Trump's defense team debated the rules for the ongoing impeachment trial in the Senate. The proceedings lasted for 13 hours and went on until around 2 o'clock in the morning.

Hours into the debate, Congressman Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) responded to a rhetorical question from Trump attorney Jay Sekulow, who had asked "Why are we here?"

It led to a mic drop moment for Jeffries.

Keep reading...
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

This past December, the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing where it heard from constitutional scholars and legal experts as to whether President Donald Trump's pressure on Ukraine to open politically beneficial investigations warranted impeachment.

House Democrats brought forth three witnesses who argued in favor of impeachment, and House Republicans brought one: George Washington University's public interest law chair, Jonathan Turley.

Keep reading...
PBS News Hour/YouTube

The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President and Vice President of the United States. Their role is to advise the President on all legal issues concerning the President and their administration.

Pat Cipollone has served as the current White House Counsel for President Donald Trump since December 2018.

Keep reading...
SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

In the current political landscape of the United States, you'd be hard-pressed to find any issue that Americans on which both sides of the ideological spectrum agree.

But it turns out that even on an issue as divisive as the impeachment of President Donald Trump, Republicans and Democrats agree on something.

Keep reading...
ABC News

President Donald Trump's impeachment trial began in earnest in the Senate on Tuesday afternoon.

Shortly after House impeachment manager, Congressman Adam Schiff (D-CA), laid out the evidence against the President unveiled by House Democrats, one of Trump's defense attorneys—Jay Sekulow—asked a question in his rebuttal.

Keep reading...