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GOP House Candidate Called Out for Questionable Instagram Post of His 'Bucket List' Trip to 'Führer' Hitler's Vacation Home

Madison Cawthorn/YouTube // madisoncawthorn/Instagram

Twenty-five year old motivational speaker Madison Cawthorn sent shockwaves through the Republican party this summer when he beat Trump-endorsed Lynda Bennett in the GOP runoff to represent North Carolina's 11th congressional district.

Cawthorn will face off against Democratic war veteran Moe Davis in November, and unearthed social media posts from Cawthorn's Instagram could present a more difficult path to his victory.

Writer and Twitter personality Yashar Ali posted the photos shortly after the publication of a story by Jezebel's Esther Wang.

The posts show a smiling Cawthorn at the vacation home of Adolf Hitler, with the caption:

"The vacation house of the Führer. Seeing the Eagles Nest has been on my bucket list for awhile, it did not disappoint. Strange to hear so many laughs and share such a good time with my brother where only 79 years ago a supreme evil shared laughs and good times with his compatriots."

Cawthorn shot back on his own Twitter account.


People were divided in terms of what this signaled about Cawthorn's ideology.

While the post wasn't explicitly pro-Nazi, some said there was cause for closer examination.






Some, including Cawthorn's opponent Moe Davis, say there's a pattern of white supremacist symbolism throughout Cawthorn's career.

Until recently, Cawthorn followed exactly 88 Twitter accounts. "88" is a white supremacist numerical symbol that means "Heil Hitler." His company is also named SPQR holdings. SPQR is the abbreviation for a Latin phrase used by multiple hate groups.

Cawthorn's conservative defenders say these concerns are overblown, since he referred to Hitler as a "supreme evil" in the post.



It's worth noting that white supremacists have long used dog whistles to signal their support while maintaining plausible deniability.

CORRECTION 8/11 3:34pm: A previous version of this article claimed that Cawthorn had deleted the post, but it does appear to still be live. We've corrected the error.