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Arkansas Man Serving 15 Year Fraud Sentence Sues Texas Abortion Provider Under New Law

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Earlier this month, the notorious Texas abortion law took effect, banning all abortions after six weeks—before many even know they're pregnant.

A particularly gruesome clause in the bill incentivizes Texans to rat out their neighbors, exposing anyone who receives an abortion, or even facilitates one, after six weeks to criminal liability.

The conservative Supreme Court, for now, has allowed the law to be enforced, despite its blatant violation of Roe v. Wade, which allowed for abortions before fetal viability.

Though the nation's highest Court has sidestepped the enforcement of its own ruling, some on the ground in Texas are resisting the law. Among them, Dr. Alan Braid.

In an essay for the Washington Post earlier this month, Braid admitted to performing an abortion after the six week mark, in violation of the law.

He wrote of his decision:

"I acted because I had a duty of care to this patient, as I do for all patients, and because she has a fundamental right to receive this care. I fully understood that there could be legal consequences — but I wanted to make sure that Texas didn't get away with its bid to prevent this blatantly unconstitutional law from being tested."

Now, in additional reporting from the Washington Post, Braid is facing a legal challenge from convicted tax fraud Oscar Stilley. Stilley, who is serving a 15 year home confinement sentence for his crimes, said he isn't personally opposed to abortion, but wants to test the constitutionality of the new law.

Conveniently, the Texas law promises up to $10 thousand to those who report illegal abortions.

Stilley said after filing the complaint:

"If the law is no good, why should we have to go through a long, drawn-out process to find out if it's garbage?"

The development made waves across social media.





People are praising Dr. Braid.


The situation is still developing.