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Despite having two impeachments and a historically low average approval rating to his name, former President Donald Trump continues to boast an overwhelming influence on the Republican party—an influence that renders him a kingmaker when endorsing political candidates or recommending products.

On Wednesday, the former President issued a statement urging his supporters to read How I Saved the World, a memoir from right-wing Fox News host Jesse Watters.

Trump said in the statement:

"Great new book out by Jesse Watters, How I Saved the World. Interspersed are his thoughtful suggestions for overcoming left-wing radicalism, maintaining American democracy, moving beyond aging hippies (like his long-suffering, loving parents), saving the world from social justice warriors and the deep state—all while smirking his way through life in only the nicest way. Get your copy today, congratulations Jesse!"

There's just one problem: Trump's praise for the book is identical to the promotional description of Watters' book, which reads:

"Interspersed are his thoughtful suggestions for overcoming left-wing radicalism, maintaining American democracy, moving beyond aging hippies (like his long-suffering, loving parents), saving the world from social justice warriors and the deep state—all while smirking his way through life in only the nicest way."

Trump wasn't giving a personal testimony regarding the book at all—he simply plagiarized its promo materials.

People compared Trump's blatant plagiarism to the book report of a subpar English student.



Some said the use of the word "interspersed" was a dead giveaway.



Watters didn't escape mockery either.



Trump is infamous for his aversion to reading, so this doesn't exactly come as a surprise.