Oh, the open office. A trendy design concept. What it looks like: No walls, a clean sweep of open desk surface populated by laptop-tapping employees, supposedly communicating and collaborating like never before. What it feels like: A fishbowl, a nude beach, a factory floor, a large room filled with stressed employees desperately trying to block each other out with headphones.

Employers still love the idea of the open office, because it’s cheap, stylish, maximizes real estate and enables constant surveillance of employees. But the evidence continues to stack up against the actual benefits. It turns out the much-vaunted collaboration that is supposed to arise in an open office environment doesn’t happen; in fact, just the opposite occurs.

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Has your boss ever asked you to stay late? Take over someone else’s project? Or make do with an impossibly small budget? Have you at times fantasized about creating a voodoo doll in their likeness?

As it turns out, science says that’s exactly what you should be doing.

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Prime Minister of Iceland Katrin Jakobsdottir, then the Chairperson of the Left-Green Movement, gives an interview during the election on October 28, 2017 in Reykjavik. (HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images)

You may remember the fanfare when President Barack Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act as one of his first acts in office. And no doubt you recall all the think-pieces about Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s 50/50 gender split cabinet when he took office in 2015. But Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson of Iceland has bested them both.

Iceland has just become the first country to require that employers prove that they pay their female employees the same rate as their male employees. The rule will apply to all companies with 25 or more employees, and companies subject to it will undergo inspections every three years to ensure that they continue to adhere to it, or face a daily fine.

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Jeff Jones, the president of Uber and it's second in command, is leaving the company. Jones joined Uber at the end of August 2016 to run the company's operations, marketing and customer support .

In a statement on his resignation, Jones said, "It is now clear, however, that the beliefs and approach to leadership that have guided my career are inconsistent with what I saw and experienced at Uber, and I can no longer continue as president of the ride sharing business."

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