Imagine lying on a pristine beach. You are alone, with nothing but a beach chair and the sound of those turquoise waves breaking on the white sand to keep you company. Can you picture it? Yes, but can you actually picture it? Like, do you see the waves moving and breaking, do you see the sand sifting between your toes? Or do you see… nothing?

If you’re like about two percent of the population, you see nothing—a newly-discovered condition known as aphantasia. Discovered in 2015, the study of aphantasia is complicated by the fact that it’s hard to determine whether aphantasia is even real. We can’t look into each other’s minds to see what the other sees.  So when people are asked to imagine things and describe what they see, it’s hard to tell whether they are just seeing the same thing and describing them differently.  

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A normal brain (left) and the boy missing a visual cortex (right) (Inaki-Carril Mundinano,Juan Chen,Mitchell de Souza,Marc G. Sarossy,Marc F. Joanisse,Melvyn A. Goodale,James A. Bourne)

When young people learn about their five senses, they learn the basics: which parts of their body allow them to see, smell, taste, hear and touch. But sight for one Australian seven-year-old is much more complicated. A recent case study shows that he is the first known person to be able to see despite damage to the “seeing” part of his brain.

Not only can the boy, known as B.I., see, he can see better than many people with normal brains. He’s simply a bit near-sighted.

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[DIGEST: New York Times, CNBC]

Donald Trump’s American-exclusive policies and rhetoric have already affected the American tourism industry?

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American hospitals and the AARP are the two newest opponents to the GOP repeal and replace bill for Obamacare.

The American Hospital Association (AHA) announced yesterday it would oppose the American Health Care Act. In doing so, AHA became the first health industry group to voice its opposition to the legislation.

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