President Donald Trump smiles during an event in the East Room of the White House, April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

The Swedish Transport Agency denied a request for a "TRUMP" vanity license plate in a nod to President Donald Trump, citing the agency's rules against plates featuring political commentary.

According to Swedish newspaper The Aftonbladet, the man who applied for the plate, Marcus Saaf, said he “was drunk and thought it was fun to apply,” noting that his car is American made.

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Technology continues to advance at an exponential rate. With that unprecedented growth, technology continues to grow closer and closer to our bodies. As a society, we have become reliant on our smartphones and smartwatches. Now, technology is getting under people’s skin.

In Sweden, thousands of individuals have had microchips inserted into their hands. Ideally, the chips are designed to make daily life more convenient. The chips have the capability to access homes, offices, and gyms with a simple swipe of the individual’s hand.

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The electric car is picking up speed as consumers and governments around the world embrace these greener, cleaner high-tech vehicles. Battery technology has evolved to the point where the top-performing EVs can operate for 110 to 150 miles on a single charge — a very respectable range for a commuter. But for someone who is traveling an extended distance, finding a place to recharge remains a challenge in many places.

A countrywide EV charging infrastructure is slowly rolling out in commercial and public places.  Drivers in many places can now charge their car while they are getting groceries or get a quick charge at a gas station. (How quick? The world’s fastest charger gives drivers 120 miles worth of energy in just 8 minutes.) In Sweden, however, drivers need only change their route.

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Screenshot via Natural Cycles

Smartphone apps do a lot of things these days. They can turn on your home thermostat, test your blood-alcohol content, and even diagnose car trouble. One thing they apparently can’t do, however, is eliminate human error from processes that require consistent decision making. Such as birth control.

You may have heard of Natural Cycles, the fertility app designed by Swedish physicists. It was the first app in the world to be certified by the European Union as a form of contraception, and as of late 2017 had more than 600,000 users in 160 countries. Based on an algorithm using a woman’s basal body temperature to predict fertility, Natural Cycles was reported to have an effectiveness rate around 93 percent — comparable to that of the oral contraceptive pill.

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[DIGEST: Bloomberg, Business Insider]

Tax reform has been on President Donald Trump's priority list since he entered office, but so far, all his administration has produced is a one-page "statement of principles," which Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn unveiled late last month.

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Sweden has run out of trash. In fact, it has become such an expert at managing its own waste that it has to import garbage from neighboring countries to keep its 32 waste-to-energy (WTE) plants running—2.7 million metric tons in 2014. Less than one percent of its trash ends up in landfills. In the United States, that percentage is 54.

So what is Sweden doing that we aren’t? And should we follow their lead?

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President Donald Trump attempted to explain remarks he made at a Florida rally over the weekend about something ominous happening "last night" in Sweden. In a statement posted to his personal Twitter account, the president said he obtained his information from a Fox News broadcast.

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