[DIGEST: New Scientist (1, 2), The Atlantic (1, 2), Royal Astronomical Society]

A recent simulation reveals that half of the matter in our galaxy came from the stellar winds of supernova explosions up to a million light years away. A team of astrophysicists from Northwestern University in Illinois discovered that cosmic rays, which are charged particles ejected from the centers of stars during supernovae at nearly the speed of light, are responsible for transporting this material between galaxies.

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[DIGEST: EurekAlert, Nature, IB Times, Science Alert, CMNS, Phys.Org]

Gamma-ray bursts are the most intense, violent and powerful explosions in our universe, surpassed only by the Big Bang itself. Scientists know they exist; we’ve been tracking them for nearly 50 years. But the specific cause of these intense sources of energy has remained a mystery to us. Now, scientists have used telescopes to capture a gamma-ray burst as it happened, and they may have narrowed down exactly how they work.

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