Illegal immigrants arrive at a naval base in Tripoli on December 16, 2017, after they were rescued off the coast of Garabulli, 60 kilometers (40 miles) east of the Libyan capital. / AFP PHOTO / Mahmud TURKIA (MAHMUD TURKIA/AFP/Getty Images)

The Middle East, Northern Africa, and Europe have been staggering under a refugee crisis for several years. Thousands of people have attempted to flee from politically unstable and war-ravaged regions to safer shores, and many take that journey through Libya, which borders the Mediterranean Sea. Though tens of thousands have made it to Italy and Greece, and some travel through Europe to find shelter in various countries, many do not survive the trek. According to the International Organization for Migration, a migration agency affiliated with the United Nations, more than 3,000 refugees have died during each of the past four years while attempting to sail to Europe from Libya.

This crisis has caused unrest, famine and family separation, but in late November a new horror was brought to the world’s attention when video surfaced of refugees in Libya apparently being sold into slavery. The video set off a renewed international uproar over the refugee crisis, but the complicated and dangerous political situation in the region may make it difficult for aid to reach those who need it most.

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Roy Moore, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate from Alabama, smiles as he speaks during a campaign rally in Fairhope, Alabama, on Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017. Photographer: Nicole Craine/Bloomberg via Getty Images.

When Donald Trump made "Make America Great Again" his campaign slogan in his bid for the Oval Office, and then later his administration's motto, Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore took it not only to heart but also one step further. As the Republican candidate running against Democrat Doug Jones for the Alabama Senate seat next Tuesday, Moore believes America was a better place at a time when slavery was legal.

In other words, he thinks America was great before the Civil War, when slavery was still an American institution.

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CHILE - APRIL 1: Moai, megalithic anthropomorphic statues, Anakena, Rapa-Nui National Park (UNESCO World Heritage List, 1995), Easter Island, Chile. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)

Easter Island is famous for its iconic stone heads. These statues, known as Moai, are a mystery of human ingenuity. Standing an average of 13 feet high and weighing 14 tons each, nearly 1,000 statues are positioned around the island, which is governed by Chile. Archeologists have long debated what the statues mean and how on earth a relatively small population could manage this engineering feat in the years following the arrival of the Polynesian people in 800 A.D.

"It is amazing that an island society made of 10 to 12 chiefdoms had sufficient unity and ability to communicate carving standards, organize carving methods and achieve political rights of way … to transport statues to every part of the island," said archaeologist Jo Anne Van Tilburg, founder of UCLA's Easter Island Statue Project. 

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