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Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call // MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Outgoing President Donald Trump continues to double down on his lies that widespread election fraud coordinated by Democrats tipped the 2020 presidential election to President-elect Joe Biden.

Trump's own Justice Department found no evidence of fraud that could've changed the outcome of the election. His own election security officials touted this year's election as "the most secure in U.S. history." Every state has certified its results and cast its electoral votes. Trump has repeatedly lost every effort to overturn the results through litigation.

Nevertheless, a number of Republican congressmembers have vowed to object to congressional certification on January 6, when Vice President Mike Pence will oversee a joint session of Congress for acknowledgment of the results.

But with so many Republican lawmakers seeking to invalidate the election due to so-called fraud, their logic forces questions about the integrity of their own elections.

Congressman Chip Roy (R-TX) highlighted this dissonance on Sunday, when he announced his objection to the seating of representatives from Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin—Trump's primary targets of election fraud lies.

Interestingly enough, Roy was the former Chief of Staff to Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX), who's spearheading the effort to overturn presidential election results in the Senate.

Roy said it would "confound reason" for Republican congressional victories to go unscrutinized while the presidential election's integrity was called into question.





While Democrats won the presidential election, they faced steeper hurdles in the congressional elections. Democrats lost seats in the House of Representatives and the two runoff elections in Georgia this week will determine whether the party gains a functional majority in the Senate.

Critics of Trump's voter fraud lies frequently ask, if Democrats orchestrated election fraud as Trump claims, why they wouldn't grant themselves a majority in the House and Senate as well.

Roy's move reinforced this point, and Twitter supported it.






People were surprised to find themselves agreeing with him.



One thing is for certain: January 6th is going to be an eventful day in American politics.