U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands during a joint press conference after their summit on July 16, 2018 in Helsinki, Finland. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

While the results of the Mueller investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election remain hidden from Congress and the public, others make the case for deep ties between President Donald Trump and Russia under President Vladimir Putin.

The latest to do so is author Timothy Snyder who took to Twitter to list 50 reasons President Trump owes Putin multiple "favors."

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U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin speak to the media during a joint press conference after their private meeting on July 16, 2018 in Helsinki, Finland. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

During Thursday's Aspen Security Forum, Tom Burt, Microsoft's VP of Customer Security & Trust, warned the crowd that hacks, like those during the 2016 elections by Russian government operatives, continue to happen. Three midterm candidates already suffered cyber attacks from Russian hackers.

In 2016, Burt said his team discovered fake Microsoft domain names used by the Russian hacking groups —given code names like Scrontium, APT28, Fancy Bear and Pawn Storm— used to "phish" information from unsuspecting campaign staffers.

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(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images and Mikhail KlimentyevTASS via Getty Images)

On the heels of a flurry of Tweets from President Donald Trump, quoting Fox News pundits and claiming the ongoing Russia investigation is just a witch hunt, news emerged of Robert Mueller and his team focusing on what the president knew about Russian hacking of the DNC servers and when he knew it.

Investigators for special counsel Robert Mueller asked witnesses about President Trump’s connection to hacked Democratic emails leaked leading up to the 2016 presidential election.

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US President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin shake hands during a meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Facebook found itself at the center of the probe into Russia's alleged interference in last year's presidential election after reports earlier this month revealed that operatives supported by the Russian government purchased more than $150,000 worth of political ads––about 3,000 pieces of content––to spread disinformation and inflame political hostilities among the American public. Many of these ads referred to then-candidate Donald Trump as “the only viable option." The ads were shared by what looked like a grassroots American group called Secured Borders, but Congressional investigators told ABC News that the group is, in fact, a Russian ruse designed to influence voters during and after the presidential election.

Others that were purchased by Kremlin-connected accounts promoted the candidacies of Jill Stein and Bernie Sanders, seeking to sow discord among the left and apparently drive votes away from Hillary Clinton.

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Illustration. (CREDIT: Politico.)

In the early days of Donald Trump’s presidency, the Trump administration is facing vehement allegations relating to its ever-increasing ties to Russia — and these charges are gaining momentum.

Russian hackers. WikiLeaks. Collusion. Treason. These are merely a few of the terms prevalent in the international conversation surrounding the 45th president of the United States.

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