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Conservatives Are Melting Down Over 'Woke' Rainbow In Pink Floyd's '50th Anniversary' Profile Pic–And It's Just Too Perfect

When Pink Floyd changed their Facebook profile pic to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their album 'The Dark Side Of The Moon,' conservatives accused them of going 'woke' thanks to the rainbow graphic.

Screenshot of Pink Floyd's new cover art for "The Dark Side of the Moon"; the album's original cover art
Pink Floyd/Facebook; @BreeintheDesert/Twitter

Conservatives lashed out after legendary rock band Pink Floyd unveiled their new social media logo because it has a rainbow in it.

It commemorates the 50th anniversary of The Dark Side of the Moon.

The band updated their logo on Thursday, January 19.

You can see it below.

Pink Floyd's new logo for the 50th anniversary of The Dark Side of the Moon Pink Floyd/Facebook

Conservative critics suggested the band had gone "woke."

Although the sarcasm was sometimes difficult to discern from the actual outrage.

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Many whose public profiles' homophobia matched their comments found themselves in a minority of public opinions on Pink Floyd's post.

For the truly outraged, mockery awaited.

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

Pink Floyd/Facebook

The really outraged suggested the logo had an underlying social message.

Why?

Because the rainbow flag is a symbol of the LGBTQ+ community.

Their responses were rather odd when you consider what the original album cover art for The Dark Side of the Moon looks like.

And as others pointed out, it appears conservative fans of the band have taken the lyric "We don't need no education"—the opening to the band's hit song "Another Brick in the Wall"—a little too seriously.


The Dark Side of the Moon's album art depicts a prism and light spectrum designed by graphic designer and artist Storm Thorgerson in response to keyboardist Richard Wright's request for a "simple and bold" design which would represent the band's lighting and the album's themes, which include conflict, greed, time, death and mental illness.

The design was inspired by a photograph of a prism with a light beam projected through it that Thorgerson found in a photography book, as well as by album cover inventor Alex Steinweiss' illustration for the New York Philharmonic's 1942 performance of Ludwig van Beethoven's Emperor Concerto.

The album's design is ranked among the most recognizable album cover art in history.

Thorgerson said in an interview with Rolling Stone the cover art was meant to represent the quintessential light show often part of Pink Floyd's concerts.