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A new GoPro Karma foldable drone is seen flying during a press event in Olympic Valley, California on September 19, 2016. / AFP / JOSH EDELSON (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Drone deliveries are shaping up to be the future of shipping, so naturally the race is on to see which service can most quickly utilize this relatively new technology to create more seamless and efficient delivery experiences.

It looks like we might have a winner.

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"Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables" has been common advice for centuries, but soon it may be doctor's orders.

Researchers are calling for access to prescriptions for fruits and vegetables to prevent common ailments, rather than treating these ailments with medications after they've already shown symptoms. A new simulation by health professionals is bolstering this evidence.

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A anesthesiologist prepares a kidney donor in the operating room for a kidney transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital June 26, 2012 in Baltimore, Maryland. The US Supreme Court is expected to announce their decision on the US President Barack Obama's healthcare law on June 28. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI

Few would argue with the importance of organ donation—138 million people in the U.S. have signed up as organ donors, and with more than 114 million Americans on the organ transplant waiting list as of August, the need for donors is greater than ever.

While typical complications for a recipient of a donated organ include rejection, surgery complications and infection, a recent case in the U.K. brought to light yet another risk even doctors couldn’t foresee: Donations by a woman with undiagnosed breast cancer resulted in four of the recipients of her organs contracting a “histologically similar” type of breast cancer over a period of 16 months to six years. Three out of four of them eventually died.

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Henrietta Lacks

Henrietta Lacks’ story is only recently coming to public knowledge, which, given that her cells have benefited countless human lives and changed the course of modern medicine, is astounding. It is a wonder greater humanity did not know of her sooner, but her cellular capacities have been known within the scientific community for decades — and this is the major point of contention within her story.

The great-great-granddaughter of a slave, Lacks was born a person of little means. Her mother died when Lacks was a child, and her father abandoned her at her grandfather’s log cabin. She married a cousin with whom she grew up, and together they had five children, one of whom was developmentally impaired. She raised their first two children while her husband served the 1940s war effort as a Bethlehem steelworker; the other three followed upon his return after the war ended.

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Wikimedia Commons // Timothy Ruban

Before a potential drug is tested on humans, it must first undergo animal testing. The problem is, 30 percent of drugs that are used successfully on animals are toxic to humans. Another 60 percent of drugs that that work on animals fail to have any efficacy on humans.

An untold number of drugs that could be toxic or ineffective on animals could actually be helpful to humans, but we have no way of knowing it. Humans and mice, rabbits, dogs, and primates have many things in common, but in the end, we are simply different animals. Which means drug testing on non-human animals has limited value. Fortunately, scientists have come up with a better plan — based on computers.

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Medical researchers are increasingly encouraged that light and sound therapy could be effective in halting the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s, the irreversible brain disorder that causes disorientation and dementia in aging populations (older than 65), afflicts more than five million people in the United States alone. Currently, there is no cure.

A  study published by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), however, suggests that stimulation of the visual and audio cortex could be an effective, non-invasive treatment for the disease. People living with Alzheimer’s disease may also be able to administer this treatment themselves in their own time and space.

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Your mama was right: Listening to all that loud music on your headphones is bad for your ears. The problems may not appear overnight; it could take ongoing exposure to music at high decibels. Attending concerts, blasting the bass as you drive around town, and playing guitar with the amp turned up to 11 will eventually take its toll. And it’s not just music: We live in a world filled with traffic sounds, leaf blowers, construction noise and workplace din.

Even our rural environments are becoming too noisy: A recent study found that birds that nest in areas with oil and gas operations suffer from PTSD symptoms that are inferring with breeding success. These birds are the canary in the coal mine for human ear health: For us, exposure to loud noises is causing hearing loss and a condition called tinnitus, and it’s happening more often — and at younger ages — than ever.

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