WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 25: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with King Abdullah II of Jordan in the Oval Office of the White House on June 25, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

Trump’s administration recently enacted another blow to the American healthcare system. Early in July, it was announced that they would be deleting 20 years' worth of critical medical guidelines. This vast database of guidelines has been a treasure trove of critical information used by doctors and other medical professionals for the last two decades. The database went “dark” on July 16th, due to lack of funding.

As part of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) maintained the database known as the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC).

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Screenshot via KIRO 7.

A Seattle-based news station has purchased $1,000,000 in medical debt, in an effort to secure medical debt forgiveness for individuals within their coverage area.

According to The Hill, KIRO spent approximately $12,000 to purchase $1,000,000 in medical debt owed to Seattle-based providers. The station collaborated with a charity named “RIP Medical Debt, which locates, buys and forgives medical debt across America.”

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Pixabay.

For perhaps the first time, patients suffering from Huntington’s disease have cause for hope. A recent trial conducted by researchers at University College London (UCL) indicates that an experimental drug may significantly suppress a mutated gene related to Huntington’s devastating degenerative effects.

It is estimated that about 30,000 people in the United States and 8,500 people in the UK currently suffer from Huntington's. The disease, which some patients describe as a mix of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS, is responsible for a dizzying array of symptoms. Patients first experience severe mood swings and depression, then face ever-worsening dementia and a gradual loss of motor control that ends in paralysis; the majority die about 10 to 20 years following its onset.

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[DIGEST: Science World ReportMirrorDaily MailBBCConnected Health Symposium]

They say knowledge is power, but are there things we’d rather not know?

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