US President Donald Trump inspects border wall prototypes in San Diego, California on March 13, 2018. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

UPDATE: the U.S. Senate voted on 2 competing proposals to re-open the government this afternoon. The first, which would fund President Donald Trump's border wall, failed by a vote of 50-47. The second, which was a Democratic proposal to fund the government for 2 weeks without any money for the border wall, failed 52-44, including 6 Republicans who voted Yes including Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Senator Susan Collins (R-ME), Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO), Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA), Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT.)

Despite claims by President Donald Trump that Republicans are completely in support of both his border wall and his government shutdown, GOP members of Congress indicate otherwise. The only GOP member of the House to represent a district along the Mexican border called Trump's wall the "most expensive and least effective" form of border security; Republican members of the House supported a bill that failed to fund the border wall; and now three Republican Senators announced they would also support reopening the government without funding Trump's wall.

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Sarah Palin and Senator Lisa Murkowski (Photos by Michael Schwartz/Getty Images and National Archives)

People were heartened Friday morning to see Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska vote No to proceed to a vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh. Murkowski later explained that she did not feel he was "the right man" for the court at this time.

On Friday evening, Murkowski further clarified her position before the full Senate stating:

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Senator Lisa Murkowski and Brett Kavanaugh (Photos by National Archives and Win McNamee/Getty Images)

On Friday, the Senate took a procedural vote to end debate on Brett Kavanaugh—President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court—setting the stage for a final vote to confirm or deny Kavanaugh a lifetime position on the SCOTUS Saturday. The vote was 51 for and 49 against.

Democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia—who seeks reelection in November—voted yes. However one Republican whose term ends in 2022 voted no.

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Credit: C-SPAN

Democratic Senator Mazie Hirono (HI) is on the Senate Judiciary Committee, and as such has been front and center in the questioning of Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearings.

Yesterday, Hirono made waves when she tweeted previously "committee confidential" emails from Kavanaugh revealing his troubling views on the status of native Hawaiians, who, Kavanaugh felt, do not qualify for certain government benefits as they do not qualify as "Indigenous people."

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WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 27: Committee chairman Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) speaks during a hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee September 27, 2016 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The committee held a hearing on "Fifteen Years After 9/11: Threats to the Homeland." (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Senate Republicans must grapple with another defection now that Ron Johnson, a senator from Wisconsin, became the first senator in his party to declare that he could not vote for the GOP's tax reform plan, arguing that the bill is imbalanced in favor of large corporations.

"Unfortunately, neither the House nor Senate bill provide fair treatment, so I do not support either in their current versions," he said. "I do, however, look forward to working with my colleagues to address the disparity so I can support the final version."

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