In 2016, the state of California passed Proposition 64, commonly referred to as the Adult Use of Marijuana Act. The law went into effect two years later, on January 1, 2018. The proposition stated that it is now legal in California "for individuals 21 years of age or older to possess up to 28.5 grams of marijuana and 8 grams of concentrated marijuana for personal consumption."

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United wasn’t having a great day. Two separate videos--one showing aviation security officials dragging a passenger out of his seat and down the aisle, and the other revealing him bleeding and disoriented after the ordeal--went viral on the Internet. As the social media clamor rose, United’s CEO issued a statement regretting the need to “re-accommodate” passengers, which served only to worsen the matter by adding tone-deafness to brutality as descriptors for the airline.

The incident left many wondering what legal recourse passengers actually have in such a circumstance. There are also some who are starting to wonder whether United acted within its legal rights at all. The Department of Transportation is now reviewing the entire incident, saying

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[DIGEST: Think Progress, Oregon Live, EcoWatch]

Climate change is real, and these young people have the lawsuit to prove it.

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Apple’s recent refusal to assist the FBI in unlocking the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters has created a spirited debate over individual privacy versus safety. While iPhone users, and the greater public, are staying tuned to hear whether Apple will be successful in its fight to block access to the phone, the real battle will be over how secure Apple can make its phones going forward.

Apple’s Refusal to Create a “Backdoor” in the Face of a Judicial Order

The current conversation is around what role, if any, Apple should play in helping the government unlock a password-protected iPhone. The phone in question belonged to Syed Rizwan Farook, who, along with his wife Tashfeen Malik, killed 14 of Farook’s coworkers and injured 22 others during a holiday gathering. Farook and Malik were both killed by police in the hours following the attack.

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[DIGEST: ABC News, Courthouse News, SCOTUS Blog]

A federal judge ruled late last month that Louisiana abortion doctors do not need to have admitting privileges to hospitals, as required by Louisiana’s Act 620. The state mandate would have left over 99 percent of Louisiana women with no access to abortion, according to the ruling.

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[DIGEST: NPR, Ars Technica]

In 2011, a troop of macaque monkeys snatched David Slater’s camera. Slater, a British nature photographer, traveled to Indonesia to snap photos of the endangered species, in the hopes of raising both awareness of the monkeys’ plight, and some income for himself. One of the simian selfies, taken by a monkey named Naruto, went viral. However, instead of Naruto joining the ranks of internet mascots Grumpy Cat and Biddy the Hedgehog, the photo sparked a lawsuit. That lawsuit reached a tentative resolution earlier this month.

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Imagine this. A victim of domestic violence lives with her 3-year-old daughter in her rental apartment. Her violent ex-boyfriend is released from prison after serving time for previous assaults against her. He unleashes another attack, gashing her head with a broken ashtray and leaving a four-inch stab wound in her neck. Before passing out, the victim begs her neighbor not to call 911. Why? If someone calls, the victim and her toddler will be evicted under her town’s nuisance ordinance.

The Unintended Reach of Nuisance Laws

This victim, Lakisha Briggs, is one of many victims across the country faced with eviction due to the enforcement of local public nuisance ordinances.

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