Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images // Aaron Ontiveroz/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

No acronym has seen such a sudden, stratospheric rise to fame in the last four years than "MAGA," after President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign slogan "Make America Great Again."

Over the course of Trump's raucous campaign and erratic presidency, the term evolved to become a battle cry of sorts for the right; a way to own the libs in a perfectly manageable two syllables.

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On Wednesday The Washington Post featured poll results on the comfort level of people in the United States with non-English speakers. Pew Research Center conducted the survey asking if people would be bothered "not at all," "not much," "some" or "a lot" to "hear people speak a language other than English in a public place."

The Washington Post headline read:

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It turns out that we may read science fiction less thoughtfully than we do literary writing.

According to a paper published in the journal, Scientific Study of Literature, professors Chris Gavaler and Dan Johnson of Washington and Lee University found that when mentally classifying text under science fiction, readers automatically assume the text is less valuable — in a literary sense. For this reason, humans unconsciously put a decreased level of effort into reading works of science fiction than they would apply to literary writing.

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[DIGEST: Fast Co. Design, Cornell University Library, Nature]

You might not be able to hold a conversation with your toaster just yet, but researchers at Facebook are trying to train bots to one day converse with humans in plain English.

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[DIGEST: Bored Panda, iTechPost, Huffington Post]

For individuals seeking the thrill of travel and communication with people from around the globe — but without the hassle of language courses, computer programs or actual learning — this is big news.

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[DIGEST: Science Alert, CNN, Science Direct]

Scientists have spent decades listening to the whistles, clicks and squeaks that dolphins use to communicate. Interestingly, it turns out that these complex marine mammals may have a language that is similar to ours. A team of Russian researchers has recently recorded the first ever “conversation” between two Black Sea bottlenose dolphins, which suggests that dolphins use grammatical tools similar to the ones used in human speech. The researchers state they string together words into sentences, and don’t interrupt each other while speaking.

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[DIGEST: New Scientist, Esquire, Science]

Dog owners know their furry friends go into a tail-wagging fit when called a “good boy!” in a cheerful voice. It turns out that dogs really do understand those words, according to a new study published in Science. Hungarian researchers found that dogs use their brains to process both words spoken and tone to determine the meaning behind them. The team says this duality means dogs’ brains process speech similarly to humans.

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