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The QAnon conspiracy theory began on 4chan in October of 2017 and since then has garnered legions of delusional followers. The theory envelopes conspiracy theories on everything from birtherism to the assassination of John F. Kennedy, amounting to the idea that a deep state of sinister institutions and individuals are working against President Donald Trump and his supporters to upend the perceived threat he poses against the imaginary entities.

One of the conspiracy theories QAnon followers subscribe to is Pizzagate—the debunked idea that the government was trafficking children out of a local pizzeria in Washington, D.C. The notion is as ridiculous as it sounds, but it hasn't stopped the Pizzeria from routinely receiving threats of violence and even led one self-appointed investigator and QAnon follower to show up to the restaurant defending the imaginary children and firing shots within the eatery.

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Julian Assange, the Australian programmer, created Wikileaks under the guise of a safe space for whistleblowers who feared death or imprisonment to share information. But it quickly became a political tool to be aimed at specific targets.

Whether or not Assange sold his website's services to the highest bidder is still unclear. But his one-time hero status definitely saw a revision as Wikileaks' political machinations were exposed.

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Hours after WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was arrested at the Ecuadorian embassy in London on charges that he conspired with whistleblower Chelsea Manning to hack government computers, President Donald Trump offered a take that, naturally, contradicts his past statements.

“I know nothing about WikiLeaks. It’s not my thing," he said. "I've been seeing what's happened with Assange, and that will be a determination. I would imagine mostly by the attorney general, who is doing an excellent job. So he'll be making a determination. I know nothing really about him. That's not my deal in life. I don't really have an opinion."

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The Department of Justice is considering charges against Julian Assange, founder and editor of Wikileaks. The case would largely hinge on whether the DOJ successfully can argue that WikiLeaks' actions are not journalism and, therefore, are exempt from First Amendment protections related to freedom of the press.

According to The Washington Post's sources, federal attorneys "have been drafting a memo that contemplates charges against members of the WikiLeaks organization, possibly including conspiracy, theft of government property or violating the Espionage Act."

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Illustration. (CREDIT: Politico.)

In the early days of Donald Trump’s presidency, the Trump administration is facing vehement allegations relating to its ever-increasing ties to Russia — and these charges are gaining momentum.

Russian hackers. WikiLeaks. Collusion. Treason. These are merely a few of the terms prevalent in the international conversation surrounding the 45th president of the United States.

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An investigative report published in Newsweek reveals that a Russian news organization falsified information and is leaking phony “Hillary Clinton emails” in an attempt to undermine her presidential campaign.

Despite widespread speculation that Wikileaks would deliver an “October surprise”––information that could effectively end Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign––its published documents offered no compelling new revelations about the Democratic nominee. Wikileaks released its documents Friday to relatively little fanfare. During Sunday’s presidential debate, Donald Trump preoccupied himself with the allegedly internal emails from Hillary Clinton’s adviser Sidney Blumenthal which showed him “admitting” that Clinton bore full responsibility for the attack on Benghazi and failed in her duties as Secretary of State.

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