When ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos asked Senator Ben Sasse (R-Nebraska) about President Donald Trump's tweet Saturday attacking a federal judge who blocked his immigration order, Sasse called out Trump's behavior. (Federal Judge James Robart, a George W. Bush appointee who presides in Seattle, blocked the order, which sparked spontaneous protests across the nation's airports as protesters sought to prevent the detention and deportation of a number of persons.)

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Apple will consider taking legal action against President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration. According to CEO Tim Cook, the order affects hundreds of the company's employees. The order, which suspended entry to the United States for refugees and travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries, ignited spontaneous protests across the nation's airports as protesters sought to prevent the detention and deportation of a number of persons.

“More than any country in the world, this country is strong because of our immigrant background and our capacity and ability as people to welcome people from all kinds of backgrounds. That’s what makes us special,” said Cook. “We ought to pause and really think deeply through that.”

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Associated Press

Former President Barack Obama has released his first public statement since leaving office, criticizing President Donald Trump's sweeping executive order to curb immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries and backing protesters who have, in recent days, taken to the nation's airports to support travelers who were detained. The former president ceded power to Trump just eleven days ago, and his statement breaks an unwritten rule that former presidents do not criticize their successors.

"Citizens exercising their Constitutional right to assemble, organize and have their voices heard by their elected officials is exactly what we expect to see when American values are at stake," he said in his statement through his spokesman, Kevin Lewis.

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Attorneys General from 15 states and the District of Columbia have issued a joint statement vowing to fight the Trump administration’s executive order barring Muslims from 7 countries from entering the country as well as his permanent ban on refugees from Syria. The group is considering their own court challenge, which would raise the stakes considerably against the White House because, to date, only individual cases have been brought. Court orders came down late Saturday and early Sunday from four separate federal districts in New York, Massachusetts, Washington and Virginia, each affecting the order in some way.

The statement from these attorneys general against the administration minced no words.

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In this Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017 photo, Ben Hall, owner of the Russell Street Deli, poses with a sanctuary restaurant sign in Detroit. Dozens of restaurants are seeking “sanctuary” status, a designation owners hope will help protect employees in an immigrant-heavy industry and tone down fiery rhetoric sparked by the presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

[DIGEST: Cincinnati.com, Mother Jones, Washington Times, LA Times, Mercury News, Detroit Business, Metro Times, ROC United ]

On January 25, President Trump signed two executive orders targeting immigrants. One was his campaign slogan call to build a wall on the border of Mexico, and the other to penalize sanctuary cities that offer protection to illegal and undocumented migrants.

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UPDATE AS OF 12:25 PM: Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has decided to cancel next week's meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House next week after Trump ordered the construction of a wall at the Mexican border and suggested that some of the $25 billion in remittances migrants return home would be retained to pay for the barrier. Peña Nieto made the decision after an outraged Mexican public urged him to cancel, calling Trump a "bully."

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President Donald Trump is expected to sign executive orders today that would halt admissions from Syria and suspend visas from Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen. In doing so, Trump's administration can reduce the number of refugees resettled on American soil and bar the entry of refugees into the United States (except for religious minorities fleeing persecution) for some time until more aggressive vetting procedures are in place.

The information on Trump's national security directives came from officials within the administration who had seen the orders and spoke to reporters on condition of anonymity. In a tweet late Tuesday, Trump said there would be a "big day" ahead for national security.

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