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Far-right Congressman Jim Jordan of Ohio is one of a chorus of Republican elected officials who continues to spread disinformation regarding the pandemic that's killed more than 600 thousand Americans.

What's more, Jordan continues to drum up fear of vaccine mandates being implemented by private businesses and some municipalities for certain activities.

Vaccine mandates have been issued by leadership in cities like New York and New Orleans, as well as in federal government sectors like the U.S. Military, along with untold numbers of private businesses across the country.

On Monday, Jordan tweeted that these mandates were "un-American."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Jordan's claim was completely wrong.

Not only have mandatory vaccinations been a U.S. policy for decades, but the nation's first President, whom both sides of the aisle often hail as a blueprint for American patriotism, was in favor of these mandates.

In a 1777 letter, George Washington—then commander of the Continental Army—announced his intention to require vaccinations for his troops.

Washington wrote:

"Finding the smallpox to be spreading much and fearing that no precaution can prevent it from running through the whole of our army, I have determined that troops shall be inoculated. This expedient may be attended with some inconveniences and some disadvantages, but yet I trust in its consequences will have the most happy effects. Necessity not only authorizes but seems to require the measure, for should the disorder infect the army in the natural way and rage with its virulence we should have more to dread from it than from the sword of the enemy."

People soon pointed out this historical tidbit to Jordan.






This wasn't the only reason Jordan's tweet got pushback.



Jordan has yet to backtrack.