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As U.S. intelligence agencies determined and the Mueller Report confirmed, Russian agents attacked American elections in a "sweeping and systematic fashion" to help now-President Donald Trump and weaken his 2016 opponent, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Now, the Republican-dominated Senate Intelligence Committee report is confirming the same. The committee—headed by Trump-supporting Senator Richard Burr (R-NC)—not only corroborated the findings of intelligence officials, but urged the White House to take action.

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On Thursday, in an attempt to mitigate rising polls calling for his impeachment, President Donald Trump engaged in a bit of whataboutism regarding President Barack Obama.

During his first press conference after Nancy Pelosi announced the House of Representatives were beginning an impeachment inquiry against Trump, the President responded to a question regarding the propriety of his phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

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Fox News

As speculation then official word of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump spread, members of Trump's team showed signs of stress. One of those showing the anxiety anyone under investigation for multiple violations of federal law would was Trump's personal lawyer, former New York city mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Ever since news of a whistleblower report involving a call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky broke, Giuliani made multiple public appearances as the public mouthpiece of the President. Giuliani—as Trump's employee—is not under all the restrictions that should apply to official members of the federal government.

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Fox News

In an appearance on Fox News with Shepard Smith, Fox legal analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano first commented on Hatch Act violations by Kellyanne Conway. Smith then asked him to weigh in on President Donald Trump's admission that he would accept foreign interference in the 2020 Presidential election.

Smith asked about any gray areas or wiggle room for the President when it comes to accepting and neglecting to report foreign aid for his 2020 campaign as he did in 2016.

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Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images; National Archives

President Donald Trump shocked some and lived up to the expectations of others when during an interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos he admitted he would readily accept any foreign assistance during the 2020 presidential campaign and not necessarily notify the FBI. Ellen Weintraub, Chair of the Federal Election Commission (FEC) responded to the President's assertion that there was "nothing wrong with listening" to anything a foreign government might offer him.

In a post on the President's favorite form of communication, Twitter, Weintraub spelled out the rules of engagement for anyone running for federal office.

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ABC News

In an ABC News interview aired Wednesday with President Donald Trump and correspondent George Stephanopoulos, the President stated he would accept information and interference from a foreign government in the 2020 presidential election. But after considerable backlash for his remarks, the President took to Twitter to try to provide justification.

When asked by Stephanopoulos if he would accept another meeting with representatives of a foreign government for help in the 2020 election or call the FBI, Trump stated:

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