ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Image // Dieter Hopf/Getty Images

President Donald Trump's eldest child, Donald Trump Jr., has been vocal in defense of his father's pressure on Ukrainian officials to announce an investigation into the business dealings of former Vice President Joe Biden's son Hunter's business dealings in Ukraine.

Junior insists that Burisma Holdings, the energy company on which Hunter Biden is a board member, traded the board position for influence in the White House, giving Hunter Biden special treatment because of his last name.

Speaking of special treatment...

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Saguaro cacti have a relatively long lifespan—often exceeding 150-175 years with their first arm sprouting around age 75-100—and can reach 40 feet in height. Thanks to conservation efforts, the once endangered plant native to the Sonoran desert of Arizona and parts of eastern California has gone from endangered to thriving.

Harming or vandalizing a saguaro in any manner is a class four felony and punishable with a possible 3 year, 9 month maximum sentence.

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A close up view of a coffee farmer's hands picking ripened beans off of a plant on his farm in Matagalpa, Nicaragua.

You may have to switch to tea within the next two decades if the predictions of some scientists are true.

According to researchers at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens, over half of the world's coffee species could become extinct by 2039. What's more, it's all our fault.

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Male mountain Gorillas, members of the Agashya family, are pictured in the Sabyinyo Mountains of Rwanda on December 27, 2014. Rwanda, well known for mountain gorillas an endangered species found only in the border areas between Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and hosted more than a million visitors between 2006-13, generating from the national parks alone $75m (£44m) in tourism revenue in that time; 85% of this is from trekkers who come to see some of the country's 500 gorillas. (Ivan Lieman/AFP/Getty Images)

Animal poachers have long taken advantage of the superiority of the human brain — an advantage that hunters hold over their unsuspecting prey. Humans have caused the extinction of countless species in the animal kingdom including the Pyrenean Ibex, the Passenger Pigeon, Caribbean Monk Seal, Sea Mink, Tasmanian and Javan Tiger.

While dozens more of the world’s creatures are currently at risk of extinction, none share human DNA more than chimpanzees and gorillas. It is perhaps because of this overwhelmingly similar genetic code that young gorillas have figured out how to dismantle noose-like traps to which their peers have fallen victim.

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The Mary River Turtle (Elusor macrurus) is an endangered short-necked turtle that inhabits the Mary River in South-East Queensland, Australia. This individual is a small juvenile. This species is currently listed as endangered under Queensland's Nature Conservation Act 1992, and under the federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

A pink snake that looks just like a worm, a bright-turquoise gecko, and a green-mohawked turtle that breathes through its behind — odds are you’ve never seen them, and according to a new list of “rare and cryptic” critically endangered reptiles, unless action is taken to preserve their habitats, you never will.

The Zoological Society of London in April released a list of the 100 most Evolutionary Distinct and Globally Endangered (Edge) reptiles which, according to the Edge website, “have few close relatives on the tree of life and are often extremely unusual in the way they look, live and behave, as well as their genetic make-up.”

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A Pacific green sea turtle. (Wikimedia Commons)

Want to know which species will go extinct in the near future? One way to predict the crash of a population is to take a headcount of a species’ latest arrivals. When researchers checked in on the endangered Pacific green sea turtle, which nests in only two places, on the northern and southern ends of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, they were surprised to find that the next generation is almost entirely female. That’s not good news for future breeding activity.

The gender of many reptiles is determined by how warm the egg is when incubated. In the case of the sea turtles, the temperature of the sand the eggs are buried in triggers gender development. Very small temperature differences can tip male-female ratios in either direction, and researchers suspected that rising global temperatures might have an impact on this population. The area has already seen widespread coral bleaching due to rising sea temperatures around the Great Barrier Reef. "Within a few degrees Celsius you go from 100 percent males to 100 percent females," says marine biologist Michael Jensen, who was part of a team studying the turtles in a survey published in Current Biology. "A really narrow range, that transition."

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Screenshot via Youtube.

What do you do with a panda who walks backwards? At the Berlin Zoo, you give her a boyfriend.

Meng Meng, who turned four in July, is deep into puberty. When she was first introduced to her garden habitat at the zoo in early July, she was as engaged and curious as any zoo’s CFO could hope, attracting visitors from across Europe. She climbed the trees, played on swings, splashed in the stream. But less than six months later, she began walking backwards. Her keepers have interpreted this behavior as the protest of a frustrated adolescent.

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